Xperia Lounge To Close By End Of August 2019

Xperia Lounge to close by end of August 2019

Sony Mobile has confirmed that the Xperia Lounge app will be decommissioned by the end of August 2019. This makes it another in a long line of Sony's mobile apps that the company will be looking to close. Xperia Lounge was Sony's way of rewarding its users by offering competitions, news and exclusive Xperia Themes and wallpapers back in its heyday.

New Updates Add August 2019 Security Patches To A Range Of Xperia Phones

New updates add August 2019 security patches to a range of Xperia phones

Sony Mobile has recently been rolling out a number of firmware updates to its smartphone portfolio, adding August 2019 Android security patches in the process. Sony has released new firmware to a number of handsets including the latest Xperia 1 flagship (55.0.A.6.16), and Xperia 10 mid-rangers (53.0.A.8.71).

Xperia Xz Premium And Xz1 Family Get July 2019 Security Patch (47.2.a.10.107)

Xperia XZ Premium and XZ1 family get July 2019 security patch (47.2.A.10.107)

A number of Sony Xperia XZ1, XZ1 Compact and XZ Premium owners have been wondering recently if their phones would receive any further updates. The last update arrived nearly two months ago in mid-June with build number 47.2.A.10.80. Well, Sony is indeed rolling out a new firmware update, moving the build number to version 47.2.A.10.107.

2019 Toyota Rav4 Is An Iihs Top Safety Pick +

2019 Toyota RAV4 is an IIHS Top Safety Pick +

The 2019 Toyota RAV4 has impressed us with aggressive styling and pleasant driving dynamics. And now the completely redesigned small crossover impresses with safety, too, as it just received the IIHS' highest rating: Top Safety Pick +. The RAV4 earned this safety commendation after returning the best "Good" results in every crash test including both small overlap front crashes. The front crash prevention system, which is standard on all versions of the RAV4, gives adequate warning and can stop the vehicle from hitting an object at speeds of up to 25 mph. And as an added bonus, child seat LATCH anchor access gets the "Good +" rating for easy access and extra anchors. The one caveat to the RAV4's rating is that, like many other vehicles, it applies only to models with optional headlights. Only the adaptive LED projector lights on the Hybrid Limited model earned the "Good" rating. The LED reflector lights on all non-hybrid models and the Hybrid LE trim received the second lowest rating of "Marginal" and the Hybrid XLE, Hybrid XSE and Hybrid Limited trims got the lowest score of "Poor." But all the high scores for crash safety, automatic emergency braking and seat anchor access apply to all versions of the RAV4. With the RAV4 earning the Top Safety Pick + rating, it becomes one of six small crossovers with the rating. Among direct competitors, the Mazda CX-5, Subaru Forester and Hyundai Tucson have the same rating, and also have similar headlight asterisks. The Hyundai Kona, a smaller crossover, and the Volvo XC40, a more expensive crossover, also get the Top Safety Pick + rating.

2019 Infiniti Qx50 Essential Review | Features, Specs And More - Autoblog

2019 Infiniti QX50 Essential Review | Features, Specs and More - Autoblog

The 2019 Infiniti QX50 is the brand's second smallest crossover, and it's fully redesigned for the 2019 model year. Infiniti decided to use the stylish QX50 as a technology flagship, specifically using it to debut its variable-compression engine technology. It has since been shared with Nissan in the new Altima, but Infiniti got the new 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder first. It makes a solid 268 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque, numbers that are very similar to the outgoing QX50's 3.7-liter V6. However, the 2019 QX50 with all-wheel drive (as our tester is equipped) nets you 26 mpg combined to the old car's 20 mpg combined rating. Infiniti pairs the new engine with its continuously-variable transmission. We happen to be testing the absolute pinnacle of what a QX50 can be: the "Essential" trim level. The base QX50 Pure starts at $37,645, whereas ours towers up to $59,085. That steep price is thanks to the addition of several high-dollar packages, including the $7,500 Sensory Package. This is the price you'll pay to get the ultra-luxe interior that we happened to fall in love with. The Autograph Package added $2,000, netting us white leather with the blue suede accents. Then the ProActive ($2,000) and ProAssist ($550) packages provide all the advanced driver assistance features like ProPilot Assist. Take note that the frustrating steer-by-wire (DAS) system is also included in the ProActive Package. Assistant Editor, Zac Palmer: When fully optioned as our QX50 Essential tester is, this interior can mix it up with the best in the business. You may have to sell a kidney to afford it, but the quilted white semi-aniline leather, soft blue suede and light maple (real) wood is going to make it all worthwhile. Infiniti certainly nailed it on the materials, but the interior design and styling flourishes are executed just as successfully. There's a simplicity to the flatness and gently curving horizontal lines that feels so graceful and luxurious. I feel that I'd never tire of the cream, brown and blue color combination, though that light-colored leather means I'd forever be trying extra hard to keep it clean. All of this interior loveliness was almost enough to make me forget about this crossover's interior tech shortcomings. Infiniti hasn't integrated Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, and the stock infotainment system isn't nearly polished enough to warrant such an omission. I'm no fan of Infiniti's unusual stacked dual-screen setup, and the newest infotainment systems from the Germans are far more advanced. Even when connected via Bluetooth, the QX50 was unable to tell me the name of the song and artist that was currently streaming from my phone. At least I thoroughly enjoyed that sound quality from the 16-speaker Bose Performance Series speakers. If you're able to overlook the tech issues, then spending time in the most expensive of QX50s becomes a luxury experience right at the top of its class.

Was a bit shocked at how nice the interior can get on a fully-loaded @INFINITIUSA QX50. The quilted stitching, blue suede and brown leather all play together rather nicely. But where's Android Auto and Apple CarPlay? @therealautoblog pic.twitter.com/gaGpFWpUXy — Zac Palmer (@zacpalmerr) June 20, 2019 Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: I enjoyed my weekend in the QX50. The VC Turbo engine, a finalist for the 2019 Autoblog Tech of the Year Award, sounds good and has plenty of pull. A compact crossover with 280 lb-ft of torque and all-wheel drive feels right. The 268-hp output is middling, but the torque more than makes up for it. The four-cylinder engine is achieving efficacy in the car business. We see it used in everything from sports cars to full-size trucks and it's working. Infiniti spent a lot of time and money developing the VC (Variable Compression) Turbo and it's giving a vehicles throughout the brand's lineup a new energy. Like Zac says, the interior is gorgeous. It's quiet, well-laid out, comfortable and near the top of the class. The only issue I have is with the infotainment. It's fine, but the controls and workflow are a bit nebulous. Associate Editor Joel Stocksdale: Zac and Greg went over the best parts of the QX50, so I guess I get to talk about the less stellar ride and handling. The ride itself is fairly good, very smooth and isolating, but handling is pretty disappointing. There's a fair amount of body roll, and not a lot of grip. You wouldn't know that through the steering wheel, though, which is connected to Infiniti's steer-by-wire system known as "Direct Adaptive Steering." It's feather-light and completely uncommunicative. But on the plus side, it doesn't feel nearly as disconcertingly disconnected as Infiniti's past steer-by-wire iterations. Maybe one day it will finally feel decent. Or maybe Infiniti will wise up and just stick to a direct physical connection between the wheel and the steering rack. At least it's an option, so you can skip if you want (and trust me, you do want). All this being said, if you're just looking for something comfortable to get you from A to B, this isn't a big issue, and the engine's impressive power, the Autograph package's spectacular interior, and reasonable pricing for this size of crossover, all make a compelling case for the QX50.

2019 Honda Hr-v Review | Price, Specs, Features And Photos - Autoblog

2019 Honda HR-V Review | Price, specs, features and photos - Autoblog

The 2019 Honda HR-V is one of the most space-efficient SUVs, managing to provide far more passenger and cargo space than you'd think possible from its diminutive exterior dimensions. If getting the most out of the least is important to you, the HR-V is going to make a lot of sense. It also boasts a reasonable price given that size plus a high-quality interior, ample feature content (especially the EX trim) and Honda's legendary reliability. Even its crash scores were improved for 2019 along with a number of other elements described below. The HR-V has a lot going for it, but it's certainly not a slam dunk. Acceleration is among the slowest in the segment, and you don't need a stopwatch to notice. Its all-wheel-drive system isn't particularly sophisticated and isn't a great choice if you'll be dealing with deep snow or mud. Taller drivers are also unlikely to be comfortable in the driver seat, which has insufficient travel in all but the top Touring trim. As such, we'd recommend also considering the Subaru Crosstrek, Hyundai Kona or even the Kia Niro Hybrid.

What's new for 2019?

The HR-V gets its first significant update this year. The styling has been tweaked, but it's minor. New Sport and Touring trim levels debut, bringing with them distinctive styling and noteworthy features (the Touring includes a sorely needed power driver seat). The top three trim levels now come standard with the Honda Sensing suite of accident avoidance technologies, which were previously unavailable on the HR-V. IIHS crash scores have also improved. As in other updated 2019 Hondas, the touchscreen interface gets a volume knob and some other updates. In terms of the oily bits, you can no longer get the HR-V with a manual transmission, which no one should be particularly concerned about. Happily, the CVT has apparently been retuned to be more refined than before.

What's the HR-V's interior and in-car technology like?

The HR-V's cabin is distinctive in the Honda SUV family as it skews a little more toward form than function. The rising "floating" center console that can be wrapped in padded simulated leather looks great, as do the unique touch-operated climate controls. Materials quality is excellent for this budget segment, and in general, we think this one of the more attractive and well-made interiors in the segment. The same cannot be said for its infotainment system. Sure, Honda added a volume knob to the available touchscreen for 2019, but that omission wasn't the system's only flaw. It's still a bit slow, and the menu structure convoluted. You only need to look inside an Accord to see what Honda infotainment is capable of. Along with that touchscreen, all but the base LX trim come with two USB ports (inconveniently located under that floating center console), Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and a variety of smartphone apps through HondaLink.

How big is the HR-V?

If you're looking for a sub-compact SUV (or at least an inexpensive SUV) with the most interior space possible, it's hard to beat the HR-V. It features the same "Magic Seat" as the Honda Fit – with the gas tank under the front seat, the back seat can fold completely flat into the super-low floor – affording it unmatched space and versatility. There's a best-in-class 24.3 cubic-feet with the seats raised (FWD) and 57.6 cubic-feet with them lowered. Only the Nissan Kicks comes remotely close to that. The Magic Seat's 60/40-split bottom also flips up, allowing you to store things across an ultra-long rear footwell. Up front, those of above-average height will struggle to get comfortable behind the wheel due to a driver seat that doesn't slide far enough back or dip far enough down. There is thankfully an eight-way power driver seat available for 2019 that should at least partially rectify this, but it's exclusive to the top trip level. Outside, the HR-V is 169.1 inches long, which is pretty much mid-pack for the segment, falling in between the bigger Subaru Crosstrek and smaller Hyundai Kona. Its 63.2-inch height is typical for the segment, and its ground clearance is modest at 7.3 inches with front-wheel drive and 6.7 inches with all-wheel drive. That's actually as good or better than many competitors, but also not well suited to actually venturing off the beaten path (its unsophisticated all-wheel-drive system doesn't help on that front, either).

What's the HR-V's performance and fuel economy?

The situation under the HR-V's hood is pretty simple. Every version comes with a 1.8-liter inline-four that produces 141 horsepower and 127 pound-feet of torque, one of the lowest outputs in the segment. Front-wheel drive and a continuously variable transmission (CVT) are standard, while all-wheel drive is an option. The front-drive HR-V returns an estimated 28 mpg city, 34 mph highway and 30 mpg combined, making it one of the thriftiest in the segment. All-wheel drive lowers those estimates to 26/31/28 in most trim levels with the LX basically getting 1 mpg better. 

What's the HR-V like to drive?

The HR-V is very slow. Honda says it improved the sluggish responses of the CVT for 2019, and although we haven't yet sampled this change, we doubt it'll do much to help one of the weakest engines in the segment. This is a shame, since Honda has much better engines at its disposal. It's also a shame since the HR-V is otherwise a competent little SUV to drive. Corners are taken with relative poise and the steering is precise. Meanwhile, ride comfort is better than most as are wind and road noise.

What more can I read about the Honda HR-V?

2019 Honda HR-V: More trims, higher prices, no manual

Our breakdown of what's new for the 2019 Honda HR-V.

2019 Subaru Crosstrek A 'top Safety Pick +' - Autoblog

2019 Subaru Crosstrek a 'Top Safety Pick +' - Autoblog

The IIHS has finally evaluated the 2019 Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid, the plug-in version of the subcompact crossover, and it performs just as well as its fully gas-powered twin. Its high marks earned it the organization's highest award of Top Safety Pick +. In every crash test, the Crosstrek earned the highest "Good" rating for protection, including both driver and passenger small overlap collisions. Forward collision prevention also earned top marks, stopping the vehicle before a crash at speeds up to 25 mph. This is one area where the Hybrid improves on the standard model, not for better results, but for the fact that the forward collision prevention system is standard on all Hybrid variants. It's an option on base and Premium non-hybrid Crosstreks. The headlights are a similar situation. The Hybrid's standard headlights also received the "Good" rating like top-trim Crosstreks. Where the non-hybrid Crosstreks trip up is that the base and Premium trims have headlights that have the worst "Poor" rating. Parity resumes with LATCH child seat anchor accessibility, which gets a "Good+" rating for having easily reachable anchors and having extras for seating flexibility.

Sony's 'what's New' And 'audio Recorder' Apps To Close In September 2019

Sony's 'What's New' and 'Audio Recorder' apps to close in September 2019

Sony Mobile is looking to shutter two more apps according to notices that have appeared. Both the ‘What's New' app and the ‘Audio Recorder' apps will be retired on 30 September 2019. The ‘What's New' app was Sony's curated selection of apps that it was looking to promote. Most users always looked for a way to disable the app, so we don't imagine many will miss it.

Some 2019 Subaru Outbacks And Legacys Recalled For Compromising Welds - Autoblog

Some 2019 Subaru Outbacks and Legacys recalled for compromising welds - Autoblog

Subaru is recalling a total of 2,107 brand-new vehicles due to faulty welds located on the duct below the cowl panel that could compromise the vehicle's body strength, increasing the risk of injury in a crash. The 2019 Outback and 2019 Legacy are the two models involved with the recall. However, there are only 142 Legacys impacted, whereas 1,965 Outbacks are being called back. Subaru says customers will have a few options if they have one of the affected vehicles. You'll be able to exchange the vehicle, let Subaru buy it back, or return the car for some intensive repairs. Perhaps this recall reminds you of the situation the Ascent was in last year. The large Subaru SUV was recalled due to it missing a series of spot welds on the B-pillar, weakening the structure. Subaru said it planned to destroy all 293 Ascents that were thought to be affected at the time. These new faulty welds are described differently than the ones we saw previously. Here's Subaru's explanation for what went wrong: "During the manufacturing process at the supplier's factory, the spot-welder tip is cleaned and re-shaped by a dresser (grinding machine). During production of potentially affected parts, the grinding machine may have been blocked by excess metal chips/powder, thus reducing the effectiveness of the welder." Subaru reportedly told Consumer Reports that most of the vehicles being recalled haven't even reached the dealerships yet, with fewer than 20 of the vehicles in customer hands. That makes sense, as Subaru says the affected vehicles were built between May 31 and June 6, 2019. Subaru said a bodyshop employee initially noticed the defect on June 6, which prompted an internal investigation, leading to the recall. We've asked Subaru if it could provide any more detail about the recall beyond what the official documents show. If you have a 2019 Outback or Legacy affected by this issue, expect to receive a letter in the mail soon. Thankfully, there won't be many people who will be getting those recall notices.