Head To Japan In Episode Three Of 'the Autoblog Show'

Head to Japan in episode three of 'The Autoblog Show'

The Autoblog Show returns to Fios TV this Sunday for its third episode, this time, from the country of Japan. 

Senior Editor, Green, John Snyder, Senior Producer Christopher McGraw and Producer Alex Malburg head to the headquarters of Nissan and Subaru to test out the companies' latest in autonomous and electric vehicle technology. Afterwards we travel to the Honda Collection Hall in Motegi, to travel through the company's long history, from motorbikes to champion F1 cars and everything in between.

Autoblog Podcast #628: Driving The Acura Nsx, 2 Series Gran Coupe And Honda Civic Si

Autoblog Podcast #628: Driving the Acura NSX, 2 Series Gran Coupe and Honda Civic Si

In this week's Autoblog Podcast, Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore is joined by West Coast Editor James Riswick and Road Test Editor Zac Palmer. This week, they're driving a 2020 Acura NSX, two versions of the BMW 2 Series Gran Coupe (M235i and 228i) and the updated 2020 Honda Civic Si. Then, the gang gets to talking about what they'd drive in 1975 and 1985, along with plenty of other tangents. Finally, they wrap it up with news about the upcoming 2021 Acura TLX Type S and the fate of this year's Woodward Dream Cruise.

Autoblog Podcast #625: Toyota Supra, Subaru Wrx Sti S209, Mercedes-benz Cla And Glb

Autoblog Podcast #625: Toyota Supra, Subaru WRX STI S209, Mercedes-Benz CLA and GLB

In this week's Autoblog Podcast, Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore is joined by West Coast Editor James Riswick and News Editor Joel Stocksdale. First, they talk about the cars they've been driving, including the Toyota Supra, Subaru WRX STI S209, and the Mercedes-Benz CLA and GLB. They also discuss rumors of the Kia Stinger getting killed off. Greg Migliore takes a break to chat with Autoblog contributor Dan Edmunds to talk about the cars he's been testing. Finally, our editors take to the mailbag to help a listener pick a sport truck in the "Spend My Money" segment.

Autoblog Podcast #622: Nissan Frontier, Mid-engine Mustang Mystery, Chevy Trail Boss, Personal Luxury Coupes

Autoblog Podcast #622: Nissan Frontier, mid-engine Mustang mystery, Chevy Trail Boss, personal luxury coupes

In this week's Autoblog Podcast, Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore is joined by News Editor Joel Stocksdale and Associate Editor Byron Hurd. They discuss news about the 2020 and 2021 Nissan Frontier, as well as a mystery Mustang and classic luxury coupes. After that, they talk about cars from the fleet including Chevy Silverados and the long-term Volvo S60 T8.

Autoblog Podcast #621: Nissan Titan, Hyundai Kona, Mitsubishi Outlander Phev

Autoblog Podcast #621: Nissan Titan, Hyundai Kona, Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

In this week's Autoblog Podcast, Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore is joined by Consumer Editor Jeremy Korzeniewski and Senior Editor, Green, John Beltz Snyder. They talk about cars they've driven recently, including the 2020 Nissan Titan Pro-4X, Hyundai Kona and Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV. Then they talk news, starting with Volvo's new pick-up and drop-off service. Then they talk about Q1 U.S. sales figures. Lastly, they discuss the possibility of new styles of motorcycle from Harley-Davidson, including a flat-track bike and a cafe racer.

Autoblog Podcast #620: Mazda6, Lexus Ux 250h, Honda Cr-v, Bmw Z3, And Coronavirus

Autoblog Podcast #620: Mazda6, Lexus UX 250h, Honda CR-V, BMW Z3, and coronavirus

In this week's Autoblog Podcast, Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore is joined by West Coast Editor James Riswick and Road Test Editor Zac Palmer. First, they talk about the cars that have been in their driveways, like the Mazda6, Lexus UX 250h and Honda CR-V, as well as Riswick's own BMW Z3 (where he actually recorded the podcast from). Then they discuss the news, which includes car dealers moving to digital commerce and other updates about — you guessed it — coronavirus, and how it's affecting the automotive industry. Finally, they take to Twitter to help a follower choose a weekend convertible for long, isolated drives in this week's "Spend My Money" segment.

Watch The Autoblog Livestream Right Here

Watch the Autoblog livestream right here

The world is a crazy place and this is a crazy time. Everyone is looking for a good way to unwind, even us. We've been streaming racing and driving games on Twitch, Youtube, and Mixer a few days a week for a while now, but we're expanding that for the immediate future. Starting today, we'll be live Monday through Thursday at 2 P.M. to play all kinds of racing and driving games. Check us out on Twitch,Youtube, or Mixer. 

So far we've played:

Autoblog Podcast #590: Subaru Outback, Cadillac Xt6, Mercedes-amg C63 S, Hyundai Palisade

Autoblog Podcast #590: Subaru Outback, Cadillac XT6, Mercedes-AMG C63 S, Hyundai Palisade

In this week's Autoblog Podcast, Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore is joined by Senior Green Editor John Snyder and Associate Editor Joel Stocksdale. This episode is all about driving, on- and off-road, and in a variety of vehicles. In particular, the trio are talking about recent experiences in the 2020 Subaru Outback, 2020 Cadillac XT6, 2019 Mercedes-AMG C 63 S and 2020 Hyundai Palisade. At the end, they tackle an interesting and particularly tough "Spend My Money" question involving whether or not to put off purchasing a Jeep Wrangler in favor of a sensible daily driver. Autoblog Podcast #590

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2020 Honda Pilot Black Edition Debuts In All Black Everything - Autoblog

2020 Honda Pilot Black Edition debuts in all black everything - Autoblog

The Honda Pilot isn't a shouty SUV, but this 2020 Pilot Black Edition is aiming to change your mind. All black everything is the theme here, and we think Honda has captured the look successfully with this Pilot. Honda is positioning the Black Edition as the absolute peak of luxury for the Pilot lineup, with the MSRP being even higher than the Elite. With the $1,095 destination charge added in, you'll be paying $50,715. So yes, there's finally a Pilot for over $50,000. That's expensive, but even a fully-loaded Explorer is about $60,000. For your hard-earned dollars, Honda provides blackout treatments to the grille, headlight trim, side trim, door handles, window trim and fog light trim. The 20-inch alloy wheels are also painted in black. Basically, if it could be done in black, Honda has done it. There's a striking surprise waiting on the interior, though. Instead of a bland black interior, Honda is sprinkling in red accents throughout. You get red stitching on the front and second-row seats, door panels and the steering wheel. Red accent lighting can be found on the doors, cupholders and dash. Then, you get a sweet, red center console lid that looks shockingly cool. Black Edition logos can be found on the grille, tailgate, front seats and floor mats. Maybe it'll all be cool enough to wrangle folks into a more expensive Pilot over a Passport. The rest of the 2020 Honda Pilot lineup increases in price ever so slightly. Front-wheel-drive models see an increase of $100 in MSRP, whereas all-wheel-drive Pilots are $200 more expensive than an equivalent 2019 Pilot. This means the cheapest Pilot LX with front-wheel drive now costs $32,645. Honda says the 2020 model year Pilot will begin to arrive in dealerships tomorrow.

Honda Civic Type R Tcr | Race Car Review - Autoblog

Honda Civic Type R TCR | Race car review - Autoblog

PONTIAC, Mich. — The Honda Civic Type R is a wonderful machine. While the exterior design is not for everyone, there's no arguing about how well the car drives. We love its sharp steering, slick six-speed manual and nimble chassis, making it one of the best hot hatches of all time. On a sunny afternoon at M1 Concourse, an 11-turn, 1.5-mile road course in Pontiac, I was given a brief opportunity to sample something even hotter: Todd Lamb and Atlanta Speedwerks' No. 84 Honda Civic Type R TCR. The Type R TCR is a fully-prepped, factory-backed spec racer ready to compete in a number of global series. The TCR formula is FIA sanctioned, with races found all over the world, the most notable of which is the World Touring Car Cup, where you'll see Type R TCRs battle against models like the Audi RS3 LMS, Volkswagen Golf GTI TCR and Hyundai Veloster N TCR. Honda HPD even provides support at certain races. You still have to field your own crew, but Honda is there to help. And it's available to anyone with enough cash. For $172,238, you get the car, complete with an XTRAC sequential gearbox, a MoTec ECU, Ohlins dampers, 18x10-inch O.Z. wheels, stainless exhaust, an FT3 100-liter fuel tank and an adjustable differential preload. Other features include a cage, an air-jack system, an OMP seat and harness, and a multi-function quick-release steering wheel. You can purchase set-up tools – a quick-filling fuel system, toe setting equipment, clutch centering tool, footrest assembly, shock pump, set up wheel, front pads changing spacer tool and side impact panels – for $13,298. Spare suspension components, brake discs, a front splitter and wheel spacers are another $21,402. An upgraded ABS system is $12,768, a data and scrutineering logger is $4,664 and homologation documents showing the car meets TCR regulations is $1,344. Final assembly for the car is handled in Italy by J.A.S. Motorsports, but, like the regular Type R, the engines are built in Ohio while bodies-in-white come from England. The front and rear bumpers are both composite, as are the significantly wider front and rear fenders meant to cover the 10-inch wide wheels. The front fenders in particular look massive, but they only add 2.9 inches to the Type R's width. The adjustable rear wing makes the standard car's aero look paltry by comparison, but the whole thing comes together in a purposeful sort of way. I wouldn't go so far as to say it's pretty, but – especially when viewed from the front – it's quite intimidating. The gutted interior means every rock or pebble snaps, pings and reverberates throughout what amounts to a giant metal and composite can. The doors and dash are both black plastic, meaning the only things to really look at inside are the digital display and the smattering of buttons and toggles where the center console used to be. The display itself shows tons of data, from individual wheel speed to steering angle to temperatures for just about everything on the car. You're locked in tight thanks to the six-point harness, but visibility is still pretty good. After all, this is still a Civic. On the track, the Type R TCR drives like a single-minded Civic with all semblance of comfort stripped away, leaving you with a very loud and very fast hot hatch. It still feels like the same basic car, but everything has been dialed to 11. The standard Civic Type R's 2.0-liter turbocharged inline-four sends 306 horsepower to the front wheels, but the TCR turns things up a bit thanks to a modified intake, exhaust and a unique engine map. Output is around 340 horsepower, though that can be adjusted to keep parity within the racing class. It's not the most explosive thing I've ever driven in a straight line, but, outside of some wheelslip in the track's tightest corner, the Type R TCR puts the power down with ease. There's a clutch, but you only use it to get rolling in first gear. Beyond that you only need to pull one of the wheel-mounted paddles to shift the six-speed sequential gearbox. Shifts are sharp and aggressive, cracking off with a loud bark from the engine. The steering feel is excellent. It doesn't take much movement from the small wheel to bend the Civic around a corner. There's a slight tug if you get on the power too early, but wind things out and the car points straight and true. The brakes require a bit more pressure than I expected, but when the calipers do clamp, they clamp hard. There's no drama or protesting squeals from the tires, just a bit of a dip in the nose and a little pressure in your chest as the harness holds you down. We only had 10 laps in total and I could have gone for 50 more. It was a riot, but not in the same way as something like a Lamborghini, Ferrari or McLaren. Those cars are brutally quick and could easily outgun the Type R TCR in a straight line. But the raw sensations are what make the Civic Type R TCR so enjoyable. It cuts through the fat and delivers the single most exhilarating experience I've ever had in a front-wheel-drive car, and one of the most enjoyable I've had in any car. Sure, you can buy a sleek, leather-lined mid-engine Italian supercar for roughly the same money, but this is a real racecar prepped to compete in a professional series, complete with spare parts and factory support. Trust us, that's sure not something you get if you spend a quarter million on a Lamborghini, nor will you get the same steady dose of adrenaline handing the keys off to a valet as you will dicing it up with WTCC competitors turning laps in anger. There are cheaper ways to go racing, but considering what the Civic Type R TCR provides, it seems like a bargain to us.

2021 Toyota Sienna Spy Photos From Death Valley - Autoblog

2021 Toyota Sienna spy photos from Death Valley - Autoblog

It seems like we've been writing "the Toyota Sienna enters yet another year without a full redesign" forever at this point. The current generation dates back to 2011 and is continuing into year 10 as we detail in our 2020 Toyota Sienna review. Now, there was a substantial overhaul of its interior and structure for 2015, while the powertrain was replaced two years later, and other important updates to its feature content made thereafter. In the meantime, though, the Kia Sedona and Honda Odyssey were completely redesigned and the Chrysler Pacifica became a thing. The Nissan Quest was reborn and died again. Nobody seemed to notice. Anyway, the Toyota Sienna is extremely long in the tooth, but these fresh spy photos would indicate it's finally going to see the dentist. That's how that metaphor works, right? Though covered in copious black plastic, this is most definitely not yet another warmed over version of the current van. Note the door mirrors migrating to the doors and the little quarter window above it now residing adjacent to the main front side window rather than within the A pillar. The rear quarter also appears quite different, possibly indicating some sort of rising element not unlike the Lexus RX. Of course, that bit of camouflage could also be a leftover from an old RX test vehicle being used to throw us off, but it seems likely that Toyota would try to make that area more interesting given its recent over-the-top styling as well as what was done with the past two Honda Odysseys.   The big wheels, lower grille mesh and flared rocker panels suggest that this particular next-generation Sienna is an SE, the "sportier" trim level that boasts tighter suspension and steering tuning (current version shown above). Much like it did with the recently redesign Camry and Avalon, it seems reasonable to assume that the dynamic gap between the Sienna's LE and SE trim levels would narrow given the handling improvements inherent to Toyota's TNG platform that assuredly underpins its new minivan.  Despite the new platform, we expect the current powertrain to carry over mostly unchanged apart from perhaps a minor power bump. We also wouldn't be surprised to see a new Sienna Hybrid, as most TNG cars are available as hybrids. Would it be a plug-in as the Chrysler Pacifica hybrid is? That's questionable.  Given how comprehensively wrapped this test vehicle is, it seems like the next-generation Sienna is awfully close to completion. We wouldn't be surprised to see it shown at the Los Angeles Auto Show in November or even earlier. Sales probably wouldn't be too long after. That would certainly help explain why the 2020 Sienna was announced so early. 

2020 Subaru Outback First Drive Review | The Big Payoff - Autoblog

2020 Subaru Outback First Drive Review | The big payoff - Autoblog

NEWPORT, Calif. — The 2020 Subaru Outback marks the sixth generation of a vehicle, first introduced for 1994, that is in no small part the lynchpin to its company's current success. The Outback's sales have increased in every generation, with more than 700,000 sold in the most recent generation that started with the 2015 model year. Subaru doesn't expect things to slow down as it introduces the all-new 2020 Outback, which has undergone a major overhaul despite its familiar sheetmetal. The Outback has moved to the Subaru Global Platform (SGP), joining the Impreza and Forester on lighter, stiffer, and stronger underpinnings. If the 2019 Forester is any indication of how the SGP can improve a vehicle, this would mean the new Outback will also be calmer, quieter and more refined. Staging from the Inn at Newport Ranch on Northern California's "Lost Coast," with a day full of driving both on- and off-road, we were about to find out for ourselves if this would live up to our expectations. Our first driving stint was in an Outback Touring equipped with the lesser of two available engines. The naturally aspirated 2.5-liter boxer-four, with 182 horsepower and 176 pound-feet of torque, feels perfectly adequate for the driving we did at or near sea level, and climbs competently on steep grades. While it didn't perform passing maneuvers with a sense of urgency, we still felt comfortable overtaking slower vehicles when we had to. For daily driving somewhere like the California coast, or the suburbs of the Detroit, the more economical 2.5 (26 mpg city, 33 highway, 29 combined) would be our choice to live with. This is mated to a CVT, one programmed to "shift" like a traditional automatic, staying out of its own way, and providing a nice linear pull — without a rubber band type of feel — when you need to climb a hill. Paddle shifters on the back of the wheel give you a sense of more control, if that's something you need. We rarely used them. If you live at higher elevations, need to tow up to 3,500 pounds, or just really miss the days of a turbocharged Outback, there's now a 2.4-liter turbo-four available in the resurrected XT models. You sacrifice some fuel economy — 3 mpg across the board, 23/30/26 mpg — but get a significant power boost, with hardly any turbo lag and satisfying response. We're certain customers who've graduated from the likes of a WRX to something that can better accommodate kids and dogs will appreciate the boost. As we had hoped, the SGP platform quiets down the ride considerably – we didn't notice any squeaks or rattles, and tire roar was only apparent on rougher pavement. Wind noise is low, too, even without the acoustic glass on the front doors — a feature standard on the Limited XT and Touring XT models. On narrower, curvier mountain roads, the Outback handles surprisingly well. The steering is particularly good, with just-right weighting, and offers the perfect amount of resistance as you dial in more angle. The ratio is quick enough that juking from corner to corner ad infinitum is done with very little hand-over-hand shuffling or unnecessary grabwork. There's just enough feedback to give you a sense of what's going on between the tires and the road surface while filtering out most of the vibration. This Outback is seriously easy to drive, and more important, it's enjoyable. Additionally, it behaves much more like a passenger car than its size and height would suggest — and it's easy to forget that the Outback is essentially a lifted wagon when it competes against the likes of the Toyota RAV4 and even the Jeep Grand Cherokee. Despite its ample 8.7 inches of ground clearance (more than most compact SUVs), there's minimal body roll, which means less stress for passengers who don't have to brace against it. When we did just that on some dirt roads, the all-wheel drive, brake-based torque vectoring and other stability systems help keep the Outback pointed where we wanted to go. Despite its sedan-like behavior, it's not confined to the pavement, and feels at home on terrain where other soft-roaders would lose their footing. A good part of our day was spent off-road, climbing mountain trails overlooking the coastal plains below. Between the Outback's standard hill descent control and all-wheel-drive grip, climbing steep, muddy trails was essentially drama free. When we couldn't see over the crest, we displayed the feed from the front camera (a feature standard to the Touring trim) to see which direction the trail led. It's no trail-rated Jeep, though, and is limited by specs like its 18.6-degree approach angle. Deeper ruts led to some scraping at the front fascia. Subaru reps told us that their team is discussing a quick-release lower front fascia that could help avoid such scrapes, but no final decision has been made. In this Outback, the EyeSight driver aid system has been improved to include lane centering assistance, bringing it to parity with the Touring Assist we tested out on a WRX in Tokyo last year. Subaru refers to the system here as EyeSight Driver Assist Technology with Advanced Adaptive Cruise Control and Lane Centering. We found it to work well, with some limitations. While it will certainly make congestion or stop-and-go traffic less stressful, on sharper curves, the lane following system would reach some limit, chime at us, and turn off momentarily. It's certainly not the best or most robust driver aid suite we've used, but we're glad that not only has the technology improved, but that it comes standard in all Outbacks. In contrast to the outside, the interior has been massively overhauled. Front and center, literally, is a huge, vertical 11.6-inch touchscreen, which is standard in all but the base trim. It fits surprisingly well into the cockpit's overall design, and moreover we appreciate that it bucks the "floating tablet" trend. It's straightforward to use, and if you don't like Subaru's native UI, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto come standard. The screen's size and orientation make it easy to glance over and see the information you need. Subaru maintained hard buttons for a number of functions, including redundant temperature controls, for which we are thankful. This is the second Subaru vehicle to use the company's DriverFocus monitoring tech using facial recognition and biometrics. This driver-facing camera keeps a digital eye on you making sure you're not getting groggy or distracted, and will chime a gentle reminder to keep your eyes on the road. What's even niftier, DriverFocus will also recognize the faces of as many as five registered drivers, and welcome the individuals with their own settings as they slide in behind the wheel. The new Outback provides a number of other conveniences, like a hands-free proximity tailgate that opens up when you approach the rear logo with the key fob on your person. With hands full, you can even nudge the flap on the cargo cover with your elbow to get it to retract. Cubbies abound, and the front cupholders are massive. The Outback also retains the nifty "Swing-n-Place" roof rails, and adds tie-down spots at the ends. And this is a bigger Outback than before, at least inside. It's only 1.4 inches longer and 0.6 inches wider overall than the outgoing model. Inside, there's a little over 3 more cubic feet of cargo space than before, rear legroom increases by 1.4 inches, and headroom increases by 1.8 inches in front and by a fraction of an inch in the rear. This go-around, Subaru offers a version of the Outback called the Onyx Edition, with the 2.4-liter naturally aspirated engine, and is targeted toward younger buyers (in a car whose average customer is 45 years old). It features blacked-out (well, dark-gray-ed out) wheels, grille, mirrors and badging. Inside, it features water-repellent interior trim called Startex, which actually feels quite nice for a synthetic material, though certainly not as plush as our Touring model's Nappa leather. While other Outbacks have a donut in reserve, the Onyx has a full-size spare tire. It also features an upgraded version of the X-Mode system, with a setting for sand and mud, and has the 180-degree front monitor featured on the Touring trim. The Subaru Outback starts at $27,655, including destination, for the base trim with the 2.5-liter engine, and goes up from there. Premium starts at $29,905, and adds the 11.6-inch head unit, all-weather package, power driver seat and dual climate control. The Limited adds 19-inch wheels, leather seats, blind-spot monitoring and reverse auto braking for $34,455. Touring costs $38,355, and adds Nappa leather, ventilated seats, DriverFocus, power folding mirrors and 180-degree front monitor. The XT turbo models start with the Onyx Edition at $35,905. Limited XT costs $38,755, and the line-topping Touring XT has a price of $40,705. We came to California expecting a better, more refined Outback with updated tech features. We would have been happy with that. But the 2020 Outback isn't just competent, it's actually a pleasure to drive – a tall wagon with stellar handling, which makes it a standout against the crossovers it competes against. It does that while maintaining the utility and charm we've come to expect from the brand. Just as it did with the Forester, Subaru applied a practiced, winning formula for the new Outback, then refined it. When Subaru sales keep climbing, bolstered in no small part by the Outback, we won't be surprised.

Honda Sports Ev Production Car May Be Previewed In Patent Drawings - Autoblog

Honda Sports EV production car may be previewed in patent drawings - Autoblog

Honda showed the Urban EV concept at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show, then showed the Sports EV concept at that year's Tokyo Motor Show. Built on the same electric platform as the Urban EV, Honda designers showed how much classic sports car elan they could work into a diminutive package. The Urban EV has since become the production Honda E, due on sale later this year. Autoweek.nl recently dug up Japanese patent office images filed last December that show a potential production version of the Sports EV. The images show a redrawn coupe, the long hood and erect, aft-set glasshouse giving way to a more modish, elegant line. And we'd still rock it until its range ran out. Styling similarities with the Honda E and the original concept remain, such as the round headlights, bulging front fenders that arch above the hood, wide rear haunches, and black decorative panels. Yet within the fastback profile, the corners are much squarer, the cabin's been moved forward, and the taillights are triangular. Along with a shorter hood, the effect is that of a pure mid-engined silhouette, complete with what look like functional vents ahead of the rear wheels. Assuming the dimensions aren't vastly different from those of the show car, we're talking about a product around the size of a Mazda MX-5 Miata. It's not the "backyard custom car feel" that designer Makoto Harada aimed for with the concept, but it puts a lot of pert confidence in a small footprint. At that Tokyo show, Honda CEO Takahiro Hachigo said the chances of a production Sport EV concept "depend on feedback from Europe and Japan." Based on our own reading, the feedback's been outstanding, and we know Honda plans to expand use of the Honda E's platform into other vehicle classes, including a commercial vehicle. Of course, patent drawings are nothing more than bookmarks notating a particular piece of intellectual property. However, if Honda put its 35.k-kWh battery and electric motor with 148 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque into the car in these images, we think we'd be looking at another electric hit.

Honda E's Full Dashboard Of Screens — Here's How They'll Work - Autoblog

Honda E's full dashboard of screens — here's how they'll work - Autoblog

We are captivated by everything about the Honda E, from its "friendly and sympathetic" exterior lines to its living room interior to its turning radius of just over 14 feet. The dashboard topped with pillar-to-pillar screens is another attention-getter. Honda released a video showing how a driver can interact with this wall of video, which is composed of five high-definition color displays. The two six-inch screens on the edges show feeds from the exterior camera mirrors. The 8.8-inch TFT screen in front of the driver shows the digital instrument cluster. The two 12.3-inch LCD screens in the middle are where infotainment happens, and it looks like anyone who can work a smartphone can work the functions in a Honda E. Customizing the screens is as easy as swiping tiles to the left from an option menu, onto a column of favorites. A button above the favorites menu cascades the open tiles so a passenger can quickly get back to a previous screen. For information-dense menu options, the input portion appears on the left screen, the display portion on the right screen; for instance, when programming a charge time, the clock to set the time shows up on the left, the schedule calendar shows up on the right. A driver and passenger can also use each display separately, the driver working navigation on one side while the passenger plays DJ on the other side. Android Auto and Apple CarPlay will mirror on the devices when a phone is plugged in, and when the Honda E stops, the dash screens can be used to play video streamed via phone over the E's wi-fi hotspot. The included Honda Personal Assistant joins the growing mob of AI-powered butlers. Saying "OK Honda" calls the assistant to attention, and it understands natural speech when requesting changes in the cabin or online services. When away from the hatchback, a smartphone app enables using a phone as a digital key, setting safety alerts and geofencing, and preconditioning. Not every function is left to digital devices — the instrument panel presents a row of buttons and a knob on the horizontal surface just in front of the displays, a row of climate control buttons graces the center console, and there are more hard inputs on the steering wheel and the center tunnel.  Honda says it's had more than 36,000 expressions of interest for the E so far, and the carmaker's taking reservations for priority ordering in the UK, Germany, France, and Norway. We'll go on record again saying we want the Honda E here, too.