Japan's Tallest Skyscraper To Be Built In Tokyo

Japan's tallest skyscraper to be built in Tokyo

A Japanese real estate developer says it will build Japan's tallest skyscraper in central Tokyo.

Mori Building executives say the 64-story main tower of the Toranomon-Azabudai redevelopment project in Minato Ward will be about 330 meters tall.

Here's A G63 Amg Replica Built Out Of A Suzuki Jimny - Autoblog

Here's a G63 AMG replica built out of a Suzuki Jimny - Autoblog

When the current generation Suzuki Jimny was first unveiled, parallels were quickly drawn between the Jimny's blocky shape and the design of the legendary Mercedes-Benz G-Class that's been with us for four decades. Aftermarket shops have since taken advantage of the perceived similarity of the two vehicles, and by swapping some exterior components, it's possible to make the Jimny look like a tiny version of the G-Class. Here's an attempt by a Dubai outfit. Fast Car Service has taken a Jimny and grafted on bespoke parts to make it look like a really, really small G63 AMG. There's a lot of new stuff on the front end, including the engine cover with fender-top G-Class indicators next to it, a custom bumper and grille, and a bull bar for very small bulls. The headlights are said to be not from the G-Class, but a Wrangler instead – still, they do a lot for the look, as do the wide arches and the side trim that takes after the Benz. Round the back, the bumper-mounted taillights have also received a G-Class shape. And get this – there are side pipes for the 1.5-liter four-banger. Fast Car Service charges $12,250 for the Geländerization of the Jimny, including custom paint, which is roughly half the price of the base car. You could also probably spend the money dressing up an original early-‘80s 240 GD and making it look like a newer AMG version, but for some reason this seems like a better idea instead. Check out Arab GT's video embedded above. Remember to select subtitles!

Acura Tlc Pmc Hand-built Edition Priced Over $50,000, Deliveries Begin - Autoblog

Acura TLC PMC hand-built edition priced over $50,000, deliveries begin - Autoblog

Acura unveiled the 2020 TLX PMC Edition sedan at this year's New York Auto Show along with the MDX PMC Edition Prototype. Both models adopt the same hand-finished build processes employed at Honda's Performance Manufacturing Center to create the Acura NSX. In the case of the sedan, that means a body-in-white pulled off the line at Honda's Marysville plant so that PMC technicians can install the interior, drivetrain, suspension, wiring harnesses, and electronics. After that, the TLX PMC undergoes the same quality control checks conducted on the NSX, including a dyno run and water leak test. The price: $50,945, which includes $1,995 for handling and destination. In addition to the craftsmanship, the sedan combines two options that normally cannot be combined, the A-Spec and Advance Packages. They install the 290-horsepower 3.5-liter V6 and Super Handling All-Wheel Drive, the A-Spec's stiffer dampers and quicker steering ratio, plus sharper exterior components like the restyled bumper, larger exhaust tips, and gloss black roof panel. Comfort features include heated and ventilated front sport seats, leather and Alcantara seating, black leather steering wheel, black headliner, surround-view camera, heated rear seats, and Acura's 10-speaker ELS Studio audio system. Cosmetic go-fast changes are seen in the red instrument cluster and red accent lighting. The whole package gets drenched in Valencia Red Pearl paint formerly exclusive to the NSX but making one special appearance here, the crimson infused with mica, metal flake and "nano pigments" for keener color. Black, 10-spoke, 19-inch wheels anchor the sedan to the road. The U.S. will see just 360 examples of the TLX PMC, each one numbered with a plaque on the dash. Deliveries to dealers begin this month — each sedan transported in a single-car carrier. The entire production run is scheduled to take six months, after which we're told Acura will begin working on the MDX PMC.

Toyota Built An Avalon Trd Drift Car With A Handbrake

Toyota built an Avalon TRD drift car with a handbrake

The manual gear shifter isn't the only stick that's been disappearing from automobiles. With the market-wide adoption of the electronic parking brake, manual handbrakes have largely become part of history, as well. Toyota recently revived the handbrake, however, in an unexpected custom car built to drift – or, more accurately, slide.

Toyota team member and paralympic track and field athlete Jarryd Wallace wanted to create a surprise experience for his dad Jeff Wallace for Father's Day. Wallace settled on bringing pops to the track and sending him out for a hot lap with drifting specialist Ken Gushi. In an interesting twist, the chosen car was not a rear-wheel drive Supra or 86. Instead, it was a front-wheel drive Avalon TRD.

Toyota Built A Mini Nurburgring Replica In Japan For Itself

Toyota built a mini Nurburgring replica in Japan for itself

Toyota just finished and opened a proving grounds facility in Japan with a Nürburgring-inspired racetrack as one of the main events at the complex.

"Based on long experience of the Nürburgring Nordschleife, which is famous throughout the world for its grueling driving conditions, Toyota has designed an exacting test course that takes advantage of local topography and features a roughly 75-meter change in elevation between its highest and lowest points, as well as a wide range of curves and corners."

Nikon D6 Rumored To Sport Built-in Sensor Stabilization

Nikon D6 Rumored To Sport Built-In Sensor Stabilization

Nikon DX series of cameras have always been aimed at professional photographers or discerning hobbyists who have the cash to splash. However, if there was ever a feature missing from its lineup that we’re sure many photographers could appreciate, it would be sensor-based stabilization (also known as in-body stabilization).

The good news is that according to a report from Nikon Rumors, they have heard from a source that the upcoming Nikon D6 is expected to remedy that with built-in sensor stabilization. For those who are unfamiliar, image stabilization for cameras typically comes in either sensor stabilization or lens stabilization.