Sony's New Carplay Infotainment Unit Puts A Tablet In Your Car

Sony's New CarPlay Infotainment Unit Puts A Tablet In Your Car

One of the advantages and features of Tesla’s cars is that they come with a huge infotainment display. If you’re looking to furnish your car with a similar system, then you might be interested to learn that Sony has recently debuted their new CarPlay infotainment unit that comes with a pretty big 8.95-inch display.

Granted, it’s probably still not as big as you might find in a Tesla, but it should still be big enough where you can show information like maps and view it clearly. This unit will support both CarPlay and Android Auto, depending on your personal preference. It is also designed to fit into a single-DIN space in your dashboard, meaning that it shouldn’t be an issue getting it to fit into most cars.

Steph Curry And Infiniti Reveal The 'ugliest Car Ever' In Hilarious Video

Steph Curry and Infiniti reveal the 'ugliest car ever' in hilarious video

Stephen Curry, the famous Golden State Warriors basketball player, and Infiniti just pulled an epic and cringeworthy prank on Curry's friend COSeezy. In case you hadn't noticed the commercials, Curry is a brand ambassador for Infiniti, so he's pretty tight with the Japanese luxury brand. The MVP invited his friend over to help him shoot a commercial for a mysterious new Infiniti concept car that Curry "helped design." COSeezy was there to react to what would surely be an incredible piece of machinery. What Curry ended up showing him was a GO-4. You may have seen one of these crawling along city streets doing the odd job or two, and there's absolutely nothing glorious about them. Curry dressed this particular GO-4 out with one hell of a body kit in an attempt to fool COSeezy into thinking it was a fancy new concept car. And he succeeded. Take a gander at the footage and have a laugh for yourself — things get rather awkward and embarrassing for COSeezy as the video goes on. But hey, that's what pranks are for. In case you were wondering, the luxurious GO-4 features a 1.0-liter three-cylinder engine that puts out 66 horsepower. It has a four-speed automatic transmission and achieves a claimed 45 mpg. The vehicle looks ridiculous, though, and that's pretty much all that matters here. Infiniti did pull an actual concept car out of a nearby garage after they let COSeezy know it was a prank. They had the QX Inspiration Concept on hand — it's the crossover Infiniti showed at the Detroit Auto Show this year.

Honda Civic Type R Tcr | Race Car Review - Autoblog

Honda Civic Type R TCR | Race car review - Autoblog

PONTIAC, Mich. — The Honda Civic Type R is a wonderful machine. While the exterior design is not for everyone, there's no arguing about how well the car drives. We love its sharp steering, slick six-speed manual and nimble chassis, making it one of the best hot hatches of all time. On a sunny afternoon at M1 Concourse, an 11-turn, 1.5-mile road course in Pontiac, I was given a brief opportunity to sample something even hotter: Todd Lamb and Atlanta Speedwerks' No. 84 Honda Civic Type R TCR. The Type R TCR is a fully-prepped, factory-backed spec racer ready to compete in a number of global series. The TCR formula is FIA sanctioned, with races found all over the world, the most notable of which is the World Touring Car Cup, where you'll see Type R TCRs battle against models like the Audi RS3 LMS, Volkswagen Golf GTI TCR and Hyundai Veloster N TCR. Honda HPD even provides support at certain races. You still have to field your own crew, but Honda is there to help. And it's available to anyone with enough cash. For $172,238, you get the car, complete with an XTRAC sequential gearbox, a MoTec ECU, Ohlins dampers, 18x10-inch O.Z. wheels, stainless exhaust, an FT3 100-liter fuel tank and an adjustable differential preload. Other features include a cage, an air-jack system, an OMP seat and harness, and a multi-function quick-release steering wheel. You can purchase set-up tools – a quick-filling fuel system, toe setting equipment, clutch centering tool, footrest assembly, shock pump, set up wheel, front pads changing spacer tool and side impact panels – for $13,298. Spare suspension components, brake discs, a front splitter and wheel spacers are another $21,402. An upgraded ABS system is $12,768, a data and scrutineering logger is $4,664 and homologation documents showing the car meets TCR regulations is $1,344. Final assembly for the car is handled in Italy by J.A.S. Motorsports, but, like the regular Type R, the engines are built in Ohio while bodies-in-white come from England. The front and rear bumpers are both composite, as are the significantly wider front and rear fenders meant to cover the 10-inch wide wheels. The front fenders in particular look massive, but they only add 2.9 inches to the Type R's width. The adjustable rear wing makes the standard car's aero look paltry by comparison, but the whole thing comes together in a purposeful sort of way. I wouldn't go so far as to say it's pretty, but – especially when viewed from the front – it's quite intimidating. The gutted interior means every rock or pebble snaps, pings and reverberates throughout what amounts to a giant metal and composite can. The doors and dash are both black plastic, meaning the only things to really look at inside are the digital display and the smattering of buttons and toggles where the center console used to be. The display itself shows tons of data, from individual wheel speed to steering angle to temperatures for just about everything on the car. You're locked in tight thanks to the six-point harness, but visibility is still pretty good. After all, this is still a Civic. On the track, the Type R TCR drives like a single-minded Civic with all semblance of comfort stripped away, leaving you with a very loud and very fast hot hatch. It still feels like the same basic car, but everything has been dialed to 11. The standard Civic Type R's 2.0-liter turbocharged inline-four sends 306 horsepower to the front wheels, but the TCR turns things up a bit thanks to a modified intake, exhaust and a unique engine map. Output is around 340 horsepower, though that can be adjusted to keep parity within the racing class. It's not the most explosive thing I've ever driven in a straight line, but, outside of some wheelslip in the track's tightest corner, the Type R TCR puts the power down with ease. There's a clutch, but you only use it to get rolling in first gear. Beyond that you only need to pull one of the wheel-mounted paddles to shift the six-speed sequential gearbox. Shifts are sharp and aggressive, cracking off with a loud bark from the engine. The steering feel is excellent. It doesn't take much movement from the small wheel to bend the Civic around a corner. There's a slight tug if you get on the power too early, but wind things out and the car points straight and true. The brakes require a bit more pressure than I expected, but when the calipers do clamp, they clamp hard. There's no drama or protesting squeals from the tires, just a bit of a dip in the nose and a little pressure in your chest as the harness holds you down. We only had 10 laps in total and I could have gone for 50 more. It was a riot, but not in the same way as something like a Lamborghini, Ferrari or McLaren. Those cars are brutally quick and could easily outgun the Type R TCR in a straight line. But the raw sensations are what make the Civic Type R TCR so enjoyable. It cuts through the fat and delivers the single most exhilarating experience I've ever had in a front-wheel-drive car, and one of the most enjoyable I've had in any car. Sure, you can buy a sleek, leather-lined mid-engine Italian supercar for roughly the same money, but this is a real racecar prepped to compete in a professional series, complete with spare parts and factory support. Trust us, that's sure not something you get if you spend a quarter million on a Lamborghini, nor will you get the same steady dose of adrenaline handing the keys off to a valet as you will dicing it up with WTCC competitors turning laps in anger. There are cheaper ways to go racing, but considering what the Civic Type R TCR provides, it seems like a bargain to us.

Honda Sports Ev Production Car May Be Previewed In Patent Drawings - Autoblog

Honda Sports EV production car may be previewed in patent drawings - Autoblog

Honda showed the Urban EV concept at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show, then showed the Sports EV concept at that year's Tokyo Motor Show. Built on the same electric platform as the Urban EV, Honda designers showed how much classic sports car elan they could work into a diminutive package. The Urban EV has since become the production Honda E, due on sale later this year. Autoweek.nl recently dug up Japanese patent office images filed last December that show a potential production version of the Sports EV. The images show a redrawn coupe, the long hood and erect, aft-set glasshouse giving way to a more modish, elegant line. And we'd still rock it until its range ran out. Styling similarities with the Honda E and the original concept remain, such as the round headlights, bulging front fenders that arch above the hood, wide rear haunches, and black decorative panels. Yet within the fastback profile, the corners are much squarer, the cabin's been moved forward, and the taillights are triangular. Along with a shorter hood, the effect is that of a pure mid-engined silhouette, complete with what look like functional vents ahead of the rear wheels. Assuming the dimensions aren't vastly different from those of the show car, we're talking about a product around the size of a Mazda MX-5 Miata. It's not the "backyard custom car feel" that designer Makoto Harada aimed for with the concept, but it puts a lot of pert confidence in a small footprint. At that Tokyo show, Honda CEO Takahiro Hachigo said the chances of a production Sport EV concept "depend on feedback from Europe and Japan." Based on our own reading, the feedback's been outstanding, and we know Honda plans to expand use of the Honda E's platform into other vehicle classes, including a commercial vehicle. Of course, patent drawings are nothing more than bookmarks notating a particular piece of intellectual property. However, if Honda put its 35.k-kWh battery and electric motor with 148 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque into the car in these images, we think we'd be looking at another electric hit.

Toyota Testing An Electric Car With A Solar Roof That Can Charge Itself

Toyota Testing An Electric Car With A Solar Roof That Can Charge Itself

The problem with electric cars is that they usually take a while to charge. Even fast charging still cannot compare to the speed it takes to refill a car with gas. We imagine that eventually there could be a point in time when we get used to charging times or when charging times drop, but until then, it seems that Toyota is exploring a new electric car concept.

As you can see in the photo above, Toyota is experimenting with a new electric car concept that comes with solar panels built into the roof, bonnet, and boot of the car. What this means is that as the car drives, the solar panels will be capable of drawing power from the sun, which in turn keeps the car’s battery charged.