Court To Rule On Ex-tepco Execs In Fukushima Case

Court to rule on ex-TEPCO execs in Fukushima case

A Japanese district court will rule on Thursday whether three former executives of Tokyo Electric Power Company were responsible for the 2011 nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant.

Former TEPCO Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata and two former vice presidents, Ichiro Takekuro and Sakae Muto, were indicted on charges of professional negligence resulting in death and injury. All three have denied the charges, and have pled not guilty.

Officially-licensed Overwatch Nintendo Switch Case Spotted On Amazon

Officially-Licensed Overwatch Nintendo Switch Case Spotted On Amazon

Back in 2018, Blizzard launched their first game for the Nintendo Switch in the form of Diablo 3. This has opened up the door to the future possibility that more Blizzard games could arrive for the Switch. There have been talks in the past about Overwatch possibly coming to the Switch, where Blizzard acknowledged that it would be feasible.

The good news is that it looks like we could be getting closer to that becoming a reality. This is because according to reports, an officially-licensed Overwatch case was spotted on Amazon, where it based on the listing, it says that it is officially licensed by Nintendo and Blizzard Entertainment.

Supreme Court Rejects Retrial In Murder Case

Supreme Court rejects retrial in murder case

Japan's Supreme Court has rejected lower court decisions granting a woman a retrial in a 40-year-old murder case. It is believed to be the first time the Supreme Court rejected approval for a retrial by a district court and a high court.

Ayako Haraguchi was convicted in the 1979 death of her brother-in-law. The 92-year-old served a 10-year prison sentence but maintains her innocence.

2019 Honda Accord Review And Buying Guide | Making A Case For The Sedan

2019 Honda Accord Review and Buying Guide | Making a case for the sedan

Midsize sedans may no longer be the vehicle of choice for most families who increasingly prefer SUVs, but for those happy to keep kicking it old school, the 2019 Honda Accord is a top choice. Its large dimensions house unmatched interior space, but the driving experience remains responsive and imparts a feeling of being light on its feet. Its turbocharged engines offer compelling performance, but also return exceptional fuel economy. Meanwhile, the Accord Hybrid might actually be the pick of the litter for its superior fuel economy and lack of major drawbacks. There's also the matter of its well-made interior, generous feature content and the Accord's long-standing reliability reputation.

If you're looking for a midsize sedan, the Accord should be at the top of your must-drive list. Its well-rounded nature made it an easy pick when we compared it to the Toyota Camry and Mazda 6. We also think shoppers shouldn't be so quick to dismiss the Accord in favor of a compact SUV. The back seat is more comfortable and spacious, the fuel economy is better, and you're not sacrificing that much utility thanks to its enormous trunk. Oh, and if you're like us and appreciate wringing every bit of driving fun out of a car as possible, the Accord Sport offers a six-speed manual as a no-cost option.

Suspect In Japan Woman's Case Grilled In Chile

Suspect in Japan woman's case grilled in Chile

Investigators from France and Chile have questioned a Chilean man suspected of killing a Japanese woman.

Narumi Kurosaki, a Japanese university student, disappeared in December 2016 while studying in the eastern French city of Besancon.

Prosecutors Seek International Help On Ghosn Case

Prosecutors seek international help on Ghosn case

Sources say Tokyo prosecutors are seeking help from outside Japan to investigate the financial transactions of former Nissan Motor Chairman Carlos Ghosn.

Ghosn was arrested for the fourth time on Thursday, on suspicion of aggravated breach of trust.

Drivers' Clothing Rules Revised After Monk's Case

Drivers' clothing rules revised after monk's case

The government of Fukui Prefecture in central Japan has revised a regulation on drivers' clothes, after a Buddhist monk was given a traffic ticket for driving in a robe.

The monk was ticketed in Fukui City last September. Police argued that wearing a robe could impair his driving and was a violation of the prefecture's road traffic laws.

Citizens' Panel Says Prosecutors Need To Reopen Moritomo Case

Citizens' panel says prosecutors need to reopen Moritomo case

A prosecution inquest panel concluded that prosecutors did a woefully inadequate job in investigating the dubious sale of state-owned land to an educational institution whose one-time head touted his close ties to the wife of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

The decision released March 29 obliges prosecutors to reopen their investigation into a scandal that has dogged Abe for well over a year, which also involves the tampering of public documents.

Cattle Farmer Arrested In Wagyu Egg Smuggling Case

Cattle farmer arrested in wagyu egg smuggling case

Police have arrested a cattle farmer in Tokushima Prefecture, western Japan, in connection with the attempted smuggling of premium wagyu beef cattle eggs to China.

Earlier this month, police arrested Yusuke Maeda, a restaurant owner in Osaka, for trying to take about 360 straw-like containers with fertilized eggs and sperm of wagyu beef cattle to China last June, without going through quarantine inspections.

Huawei Confirms Its Own Os Will Replace Android In Worst Case Scenario

Huawei Confirms Its Own OS Will Replace Android In Worst Case Scenario


It has long been rumored that Huawei has built its own operating system. Not that lightweight OS that it has running on its new smartwatches, but a full-fledged OS which could replace Android on its smartphones. The company has now confirmed the existence of the operating system while pointing out that it’s will serve as an alternative to Android in the worst case scenario. That involves Huawei being cut off from licensing Google’s Android.

That worst case scenario almost came true for ZTE as it was hit by a ban in the United States for violating an earlier agreement related to a sanctions violation. ZTE later settled its matters with the authorities and was able to operate its business once again.

Ghosn's Case Shines Light On Japan's Harsh System Of 'hostage Justice'

Ghosn's case shines light on Japan's harsh system of 'hostage justice'

TOKYO — The high-profile case of ex-Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn has shone a light in Japan on what critics call "hostage justice," in which suspects can be held for months after arrest, but any reforms will likely be incremental and slow. Ghosn, a former titan of the global auto industry, who has French, Brazilian and Lebonese citizenship, was released on bail of 1 billion yen ($9 million) on Wednesday after being held for more than 100 days following his Nov. 19 arrest by prosecutors on suspicion of under-reporting his compensation. In a scenario common in Japan's justice system, Ghosn was arrested two more times on fresh suspicions, including aggravated breach of trust, each time allowing prosecutors to keep him in custody and interrogate him without his lawyers being present. The term "hostage justice" refers to holding the suspect in custody while pressing for the "ransom" of a confession. Ghosn's case has sparked harsh international criticism of Japan's justice system, in which 99.9 percent of people charged with crimes are convicted. "The affair was reported abroad and many Japanese know that the Japanese criminal justice system is not necessarily at a global standard," wrote former Tokyo District Court judge Takao Nakayama in the Nikkei business daily. "In that sense, the Tokyo prosecutors opened a Pandora's box," he wrote. The article was part of a full-page spread headlined "What should be fixed in Japan's 'hostage justice'." Granting bail after indictment and ahead of trial is rare for suspects who, like Ghosn, maintain their innocence, with the stated reason being fears the defendant would flee, tamper with evidence or seek to sway witnesses. Ghosn had to post $8.9 million bail and agree not only to stay in Japan but to having surveillance cameras placed at his residence and to limits on his mobile phone and computer use. His first two requests for bail were rejected. "I do think that this has made the whole system, that most Japanese on the street don't really know exists, much more visible and much more vulnerable to criticism," said Tokyo-based lawyer Stephen Givens. Domestic civil rights groups and lawyers including the Japan Federation of Bar Associations have long criticized a system they say gives too much power to prosecutors and is too reliant on confessions, some later found to have been forced and false.

Not much presumption of innocence

Ordinary citizens — and media — often equate arrest with guilt. "Japan is a country that respects authority, and I think most people assume that when somebody is arrested, that there's a reason for that," Givens said. "Media ... are of that view — although I do think that some of the mainstream media are beginning to ask questions and present other views." Prosecutors have defended the system. "Each country has its own culture and systems," said Shin Kukimoto, a deputy public prosecutor, at a news conference in December. "I'm not sure it's right to criticize other systems simply because they are different." High-profile cases involving forced confessions periodically attract public attention, although no outcry has been sustained. In a possible sign the issue was creeping onto the public radar even before Ghosn's arrest, a private broadcaster launched in 2016 a television drama called "99.9 Criminal Lawyers" about defense lawyers fighting the odds against acquittal. The title refers to the conviction rate. Still, there is caution over prospects for change. "I'm skeptical, and it depends on what you mean by 'change'," said Colin Jones, a law professor at Kyoto's Doshisha University. "Courts are institutionally subject to foreign pressure. The trend has been a gradual increase in the rejection of detention warrants, and we might see a trend toward incremental change," he said.

Outline Of Ghosn Case, Legal Steps

Outline of Ghosn case, legal steps

Former Nissan Motor Chairman Carlos Ghosn has been in custody since last November 19.

Tokyo prosecutors allege that Ghosn underreported his income from the automaker over a five-year period up to fiscal 2014, in violation of the Financial Instruments and Exchange Act.