Nintendo Doesn't Want Gamers To Spend Too Much On Mobile Games

Nintendo Doesn't Want Gamers To Spend Too Much On Mobile Games

Oddly enough that doesn’t seem to be what Nintendo wants. According to a report from The Wall Street Journal, it seems that Nintendo is apparently asking for developers of its mobile games to try and make it so that gamers won’t need to spend excessive amounts of money on its game.

This was revealed by an agent for CyberAgent, the developer behind the mobile Dragalia Lost title. “Nintendo is not interested in making a large amount of revenue from a single smartphone game. If we managed the game alone, we would have made a lot more.” Nintendo later confirmed this to be true in statement that reads, “We discuss various things, not just limited to payments, to deliver high-quality fun to consumers.”

Fujifilm Says A Full-frame System Doesn't Make Sense For Them Now

Fujifilm Says A Full-Frame System Doesn't Make Sense For Them Now

In the mirrorless camera market, Sony used to dominate the full-frame segment, but with entry from the likes of Nikon and Canon, their position is certainly threatened. It also seems to show how there is a growing interest in full-frame mirrorless systems, although this seems to be a market that Fujifilm is avoiding for now.

Nikon Doesn't Think They Can Fulfill All Z7 Orders In September

Nikon Doesn't Think They Can Fulfill All Z7 Orders In September

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Last week both the Nikon Z6 and Z7 digital cameras were announced. The Z6 is only expected to be released in November, with the Z7 pegged for a release towards the end of September. However it seems that demand for the new cameras might be more than what Nikon anticipated as the company has since expressed regret that they might not be able to fulfill all orders by then.

Sony's Response To Fortnite Backlash Doesn't Assuage Concerns

Sony's Response To Fortnite Backlash Doesn't Assuage Concerns


Fortnite was finally launched for the Nintendo Switch a few days back and given that it’s an insanely popular game that gained over 125 million players in less than a year, it goes without saying that a lot of people were happy that it had finally been released for the Switch. However, PlayStation 4 owners got a rude shock when they found out that Sony has effectively blocked Epic Games from enabling cross-play and progression sync between the PS4 and Switch, or the Xbox One for that matter. Sony has responded to the backlash but it won’t do much to assuage fans’ concerns.

The block means that players can carry over their progress, purchases, and skins from Fortnite on PlayStation 4 to the Nintendo Switch or Xbox One. They simply can’t use that Fortnite account on any other console. It’s pertinent to mention here that there’s no such limitation between the Xbox One and Switch.

2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Phev Quick Spin Review | Why Doesn't Everyone Make One Of These?

2018 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Quick Spin Review | Why doesn't everyone make one of these?

The 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV took a remarkably long time to get to the United States. It went on sale in Europe in 2013, and was originally planned to come to America the year after, but didn't arrive until late in 2017. Mitsubishi was also fortunate that, in the time it took to finalize the American model, the entry-level competition remained primarily sedans and sedan-like hatchbacks, with the exception of the Niro PHEV, a crossover smaller than Outlander, and closer to a traditional hatchback. So the question is, was it worth the wait, and is it worth considering against other plug-in hybrids?

A mostly frugal and very smooth powertrain

The big appeal of the Outlander PHEV is of course its plug-in hybrid powertrain. It comprises a naturally aspirated 2.0-liter four-cylinder, and two electric motors, one up front, one in the rear. This powertrain can function in three different ways. There's full electric mode, series hybrid mode (the gas engine acts like a generator, and propulsion is handled solely by the electric motor), and parallel hybrid (a clutch engages the engine to the front motor for additional propulsion assist). The Outlander switches automatically between these operational schemes depending on drive mode settings. For example, with a full charge you can press a button to keep it in EV mode, at least as long as there's enough battery power. Two other buttons can allow you to save the battery charge for use later, such as in town after a highway drive, and a charge button to replenish the battery level while driving.