Android Q Will Automatically Switch Between Dark And Light Mode

Android Q Will Automatically Switch Between Dark And Light Mode

According to reports, it has been revealed that the upcoming Android Q will finally be introducing a system-wide dark mode. Now according to a report from Android Police, it seems that a feature in the Android Q beta has been activated in which users will now be able to schedule when dark mode turns on or off.

What this means is that if you’d prefer having Android manage when your dark mode turns on or off, you can now schedule it accordingly. For example, if you tend to use dark mode at night, you can set it so that your phone automatically enables it at night, but disables it in the morning when you wake up.

2020 Nissan Titan Getting A Light Refresh Inside And Out

2020 Nissan Titan getting a light refresh inside and out

The 2020 Nissan Titan full-size pickup truck has been spotted testing, and it appears to be getting a light refresh. This will be the first update since the truck was redesigned for the 2017 model year (2016 for the Titan XD). The updates are clearly mild, but some of them should be solid improvements.

There isn't much we can see from the outside due to some very thorough camouflage. But from what we can see, changes will be quite subtle. The bumper and its main grille appear to be unchanged from the current model. The overall headlight, grille, taillight and tailgate designs are roughly the same, too. So we suspect changes will just be to grille designs and the look of the lighting elements.

Talk With Travelers: Gora Koen Comes Alive At Night With Light, Music Extravaganza

TALK WITH TRAVELERS: Gora Koen comes alive at night with light, music extravaganza

Editor's note: This is part of a series of stories featuring the aesthetic landscapes of Mount Fuji, Hakone in Kanagawa Prefecture and Izu in Shizuoka Prefecture, which have been visited by an increasing number of tourists from overseas. Based on conversations with travelers, the series casts light on sceneries and cultural heritages that gave form to these areas.

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Japanese Team Develops Paint That Creates Heat From Solar Light

Japanese team develops paint that creates heat from solar light

OSAKA--An Osaka Institute of Technology research team developed a paint that produces heat from solar light, enabling remote places to be heated with surgical precision without using electricity or gas.

The team, headed by Shuji Fujii, a professor at the university, and Tomoyasu Hirai, an associate professor there, who both who specialize in polymer material, expect it can be applied for cooking on spacecraft, using the paint to absorb light that exists in space.

Ghosn's Case Shines Light On Japan's Harsh System Of 'hostage Justice'

Ghosn's case shines light on Japan's harsh system of 'hostage justice'

TOKYO — The high-profile case of ex-Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn has shone a light in Japan on what critics call "hostage justice," in which suspects can be held for months after arrest, but any reforms will likely be incremental and slow. Ghosn, a former titan of the global auto industry, who has French, Brazilian and Lebonese citizenship, was released on bail of 1 billion yen ($9 million) on Wednesday after being held for more than 100 days following his Nov. 19 arrest by prosecutors on suspicion of under-reporting his compensation. In a scenario common in Japan's justice system, Ghosn was arrested two more times on fresh suspicions, including aggravated breach of trust, each time allowing prosecutors to keep him in custody and interrogate him without his lawyers being present. The term "hostage justice" refers to holding the suspect in custody while pressing for the "ransom" of a confession. Ghosn's case has sparked harsh international criticism of Japan's justice system, in which 99.9 percent of people charged with crimes are convicted. "The affair was reported abroad and many Japanese know that the Japanese criminal justice system is not necessarily at a global standard," wrote former Tokyo District Court judge Takao Nakayama in the Nikkei business daily. "In that sense, the Tokyo prosecutors opened a Pandora's box," he wrote. The article was part of a full-page spread headlined "What should be fixed in Japan's 'hostage justice'." Granting bail after indictment and ahead of trial is rare for suspects who, like Ghosn, maintain their innocence, with the stated reason being fears the defendant would flee, tamper with evidence or seek to sway witnesses. Ghosn had to post $8.9 million bail and agree not only to stay in Japan but to having surveillance cameras placed at his residence and to limits on his mobile phone and computer use. His first two requests for bail were rejected. "I do think that this has made the whole system, that most Japanese on the street don't really know exists, much more visible and much more vulnerable to criticism," said Tokyo-based lawyer Stephen Givens. Domestic civil rights groups and lawyers including the Japan Federation of Bar Associations have long criticized a system they say gives too much power to prosecutors and is too reliant on confessions, some later found to have been forced and false.

Not much presumption of innocence

Ordinary citizens — and media — often equate arrest with guilt. "Japan is a country that respects authority, and I think most people assume that when somebody is arrested, that there's a reason for that," Givens said. "Media ... are of that view — although I do think that some of the mainstream media are beginning to ask questions and present other views." Prosecutors have defended the system. "Each country has its own culture and systems," said Shin Kukimoto, a deputy public prosecutor, at a news conference in December. "I'm not sure it's right to criticize other systems simply because they are different." High-profile cases involving forced confessions periodically attract public attention, although no outcry has been sustained. In a possible sign the issue was creeping onto the public radar even before Ghosn's arrest, a private broadcaster launched in 2016 a television drama called "99.9 Criminal Lawyers" about defense lawyers fighting the odds against acquittal. The title refers to the conviction rate. Still, there is caution over prospects for change. "I'm skeptical, and it depends on what you mean by 'change'," said Colin Jones, a law professor at Kyoto's Doshisha University. "Courts are institutionally subject to foreign pressure. The trend has been a gradual increase in the rejection of detention warrants, and we might see a trend toward incremental change," he said.

Leds Light Up Sendai Street

LEDs light up Sendai street

Hundreds of thousands of LED lights have lit up a street in Sendai as part of an annual winter event in the northeastern Japanese city.

Onlookers cheered as the organizer switched on some 600,000 lights, wrapped around 160 street trees, on Friday night.

Fudanjuku's Kariyase Light & Seto Kouki To Graduate

Fudanjuku's Kariyase Light & Seto Kouki to graduate

Fudanjuku's Kariyase Light and Seto Kouki have announced their graduation from the group. 

The two made the announcement on November 9 on Fudanjuku's official YouTube account. Kariyase explained, "As I turned 25 years old, I imagined myself in the future, and my feelings of wanting to go overseas started to grow stronger. As such, I decided to graduate in December."

Android P Could Bring Manual Toggle For Dark & Light Theme

Android P Could Bring Manual Toggle For Dark & Light Theme

Dark/night mode is a feature that Android users have been asking for for the longest time ever. At some point it appeared that Android could be getting the feature, but that changed. However according to the folks at Android Police, it seems that Android P could finally be bringing that feature to users.

This is according to a toggle that was spotted that allowed users to choose between either toggling a dark or light mode. As it stands, Android supports a dark mode but this can't be enabled manually. What happens is that Android will adapt its look according to the wallpaper that users have chosen.

Sony Brings Night Light And One-handed Mode To Xperia Xz2

Sony brings Night Light and One-handed mode to Xperia XZ2

Sony Mobile will finally add a ‘Night Light' mode to its official Xperia firmware for the first time. The new feature will be introduced in the Xperia XZ2, with the option found under the Display settings. We really enjoyed using the feature when Sony had included Night Light in its Xperia Concept firmware, so we're excited to see that Sony is baking this into its official firmware now.