Watch The Toyota Rav4 Awd Struggle With The Moose Test

Watch the Toyota RAV4 AWD struggle with the Moose Test

In Europe, Sweden specifically, there's a safety exam known as the Moose Test, sometimes called the Elk Test. It aims to ensure a car can sharply perform an s-shaped maneuver to avoid unexpected objects that enter the road. Operated by Swedish magazine Teknikens Värld, a Toyota RAV4 AWD-i recently displayed poor performance in the Moose Test, which resulted in the publication failing the car.  The concept of the test is simple. At maximum load, the vehicle starts in a straight line, then is forced to cut hard left, immediately hard right, and back into the original course. This is meant to imitate avoiding a moose, backing-up vehicle, or person running into the street. The vehicle is required to correct course as a way to imitate avoiding incoming traffic. This affords a unique test of the suspension, handling, and safety systems such as electronic stability control.  Teknikens Värl tested two RAV4s in exactly the same spec, and both vehicles performed similarly. During the second cut to correct course, the RAV4 is clearly upset with bouncing, skidding, and wheel lift. Here's an excerpt of Teknikens' findings:  Toyota RAV4 has quick front end reactions when we turn left into the lane. When we turn right it cuts in and the car goes up on two wheels. But the behaviour varies. Sometimes it goes up on two wheels with extreme reactions including severe skid tendencies, other times the car bounces sideways through the moose test and manages, in the midst of this hard to handle behaviour, to ease the worst forces and avoids going up on two wheels. But instead the car becomes willing to skid sideways. After much effort and great hassle, we manage to reach 68 km/h (42 mph) – a speed that is not approved. Teknikens even goes so far as to suggest the car is unsafe for driving, advice that should be taken with a grain of salt. The test also famously failed old examples of the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Porsche Macan, and in both cases, the companies contradicted the results. Toyota responded by saying it specifically ran the RAV4 through the Elk Test, and it passed under the company's supervision. Read Toyota's answer at Teknikens, and watch the video above. In U.S. crash testing, NHTSA rates the RAV4 at four out of five stars for rollover risk.

2019 Toyota Rav4 Is An Iihs Top Safety Pick +

2019 Toyota RAV4 is an IIHS Top Safety Pick +

The 2019 Toyota RAV4 has impressed us with aggressive styling and pleasant driving dynamics. And now the completely redesigned small crossover impresses with safety, too, as it just received the IIHS' highest rating: Top Safety Pick +. The RAV4 earned this safety commendation after returning the best "Good" results in every crash test including both small overlap front crashes. The front crash prevention system, which is standard on all versions of the RAV4, gives adequate warning and can stop the vehicle from hitting an object at speeds of up to 25 mph. And as an added bonus, child seat LATCH anchor access gets the "Good +" rating for easy access and extra anchors. The one caveat to the RAV4's rating is that, like many other vehicles, it applies only to models with optional headlights. Only the adaptive LED projector lights on the Hybrid Limited model earned the "Good" rating. The LED reflector lights on all non-hybrid models and the Hybrid LE trim received the second lowest rating of "Marginal" and the Hybrid XLE, Hybrid XSE and Hybrid Limited trims got the lowest score of "Poor." But all the high scores for crash safety, automatic emergency braking and seat anchor access apply to all versions of the RAV4. With the RAV4 earning the Top Safety Pick + rating, it becomes one of six small crossovers with the rating. Among direct competitors, the Mazda CX-5, Subaru Forester and Hyundai Tucson have the same rating, and also have similar headlight asterisks. The Hyundai Kona, a smaller crossover, and the Volvo XC40, a more expensive crossover, also get the Top Safety Pick + rating.

Toyota, Subaru Developing Rav4-sized Electric Crossover And Platform For More Evs

Toyota, Subaru developing RAV4-sized electric crossover and platform for more EVs

TOKYO — Toyota and Subaru announced they will jointly develop a battery-electric crossover on a platform developed for multiple production vehicles. The first crossover built on the platform will be a C-segment vehicle, which will be a small vehicle similar in size to a Toyota RAV4 or Subaru Forester. It will also be sold by both brands with altered styling and badging.

The small crossover will only be the first vehicle to use the platform, though, as it's being developed for use in medium-small C-segment sedans and both D-segment larger sedans and crossovers. So we could see electric cars similar to the Corolla and Impreza, Camry and Legacy, and even the Highlander and Ascent on this platform in the future.

2019 Subaru Forester Sport Vs 2019 Toyota Rav4 Adventure: How They Compare

2019 Subaru Forester Sport vs 2019 Toyota RAV4 Adventure: How they compare

The 2019 Toyota RAV4 is not only completely redesigned, but reimagined as well. As we detailed in our first drive review, the new RAV4 ditches the more car-like and uber-utilitarian nature of its predecessor for something that's more SUV-like and characterful. It's a new direction exemplified in the RAV4 Adventure trim, which specifically targets those folks who plan to actually take their compact crossover to the great outdoors. People who will get it dirty, use the extra ground clearance and store things on the roof. You know, the sort of people who would consider the 2019 Subaru Forester. It too is redesigned for 2019, but its transformation is almost unnoticeable compared to the RAV4's. Forester customers were obviously quite happy with the way things were.

We got a chance to drive both the 2019 RAV4 and 2019 Forester back-to-back last week both on-road and off-road, so let's take a look at how they compare, including a look at their on-paper specs.