Rice Crackers From Hachimura Go Viral

Rice crackers from Hachimura go viral

A food company in Japan's Hokuriku region on the Sea of Japan coast has been flooded with orders for rice crackers after a teammate of Japanese basketball player Rui Hachimura introduced them online.

Hachimura made history last month by becoming the first-ever Japanese player selected in the initial round of the NBA draft. He signed a pro contract with the Washington Wizards.

Emperor's First Rice Planting Ceremony

Emperor's first rice planting ceremony

Japanese Emperor Naruhito transplanted rice seedlings in a paddy at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo on Monday.

The ceremonial event was the emperor's first since he ascended the throne on May 1. The annual tradition was started by his grandfather, the Emperor Showa.

Rice Planting Resumes In Fukushima Town

Rice planting resumes in Fukushima town

Rice has been planted in a town hosting the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant for the first time since evacuation orders were partially lifted early last month.

Orders for all districts of the town of Okuma in Fukushima Prefecture were issued following the 2011 accident. They were lifted for two districts on April 10.

Giant Rice Cake Offered At Shrine

Giant rice cake offered at shrine

A giant rice cake has been placed at a shrine north of Tokyo to pray for a good harvest and the safety of the region in the coming year.

People in the town of Takanezawa, Tochigi Prefecture, observe the ritual every year. The three-layer rice cake weighs about 700 kilograms and is 90 centimeters high. The lowest layer is more than a meter wide.

Former Mazda Design Chief Kevin Rice Moves To Chery

Former Mazda Design Chief Kevin Rice Moves To CheryDesign plays a crucial role in the automotive industry. That message is not lost on Chinese automakers, which have been tapping European talents to style their cars – either by hiring established design firms (like Pininfarina for example), or by hiring their own, like Chery has just done.

Emperor Harvests Rice At Palace For Last Time

Emperor harvests rice at palace for last time

Emperor Akihito has harvested rice at a paddy field at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, as part of an annual event.

It was his last harvest, as he is expected to abdicate in April. Crown Prince Naruhito will take over the activity after he assumes the throne.

Seedlings Planted For Rice Field Mosaic

Seedlings planted for rice field mosaic

Volunteers have planted seedlings in a paddy field near Tokyo to create an artwork with colored strains of rice.

About 500 people, including local high school students and farmers, gathered on Saturday at the paddy covering an area of 28,000 square meters in the city of Gyoda, Saitama Prefecture.

'cat In A Bath' Curry And Rice Spices Up Pupils With Allergies

'Cat in a bath' curry and rice spices up pupils with allergies

Of the 110 pupils who attend Fukasawa Mill Nursery School in Tokyo's Setagaya Ward, nine have food allergies, from the "big three" of flour, eggs and milk, to nuts and kiwi.

At the nursery school, the kitchen staff chooses the ingredients and recipes carefully so that everyone can eat the same school lunch as much as possible.

Nara-style Tea Rice Brings About Aroma From The Edo Period

Nara-style tea rice brings about aroma from the Edo Period

Besides teaching Japanese cuisine in Tokyo's Akasaka district, Naoyuki Yanagihara frequents libraries to read documents from the Edo Period (1603-1867). He believes that studying the originality and ingenuity of his forerunners will show him the path he should take.

"I try to learn the changes in the ingredients and cooking procedures and make use of them today," the 39-year-old cooking expert says.

Quick, Simple Rice For One?: Cooking With Latest Appliances 'as Easy As Making Toast'

Quick, simple rice for one?: Cooking with latest appliances 'as easy as making toast'

By Yoko Tsujimoto / Yomiuri Shimbun Staff WriterOSAKA — You don't have to have a rice cooker these days, particularly if you want just one bowl, as there are single portions available at convenience stores and pre-cooked packs that just need to be microwaved. Nonetheless, small rice cookers are selling well among people who want to eat just one serving of fresh steamed rice.

The Poddi rice cooker sold by Shinmei Kitchen Co., a rice-polishing company in Kobe, does not look like a rice cooker. It's small enough to be carried in one hand. It measures 15.5 centimeters wide, 19.7 centimeters high and 18 centimeters deep and weighs 1.35 kilograms. It comes in seven colors such as pink, yellow and green.