Samurai Sword And Ninja Star Chocolates From Japan Cut Open A Whole New Way To Eat Sweets

Samurai sword and ninja star chocolates from Japan cut open a whole new way to eat sweetsThe worlds of katana and candy collide just in time for Valentine’s Day.
While a lot of high-class chocolates have a feminine look to them, a love of sweet flavors isn’t always necessarily coupled to a preference for dainty design. In recognition of this, Japanese confectioner Mary’s has unveiled its new Tsuwamono line of chocolates.

Were Japanese Samurai Really Secret Christians?

Were Japanese Samurai Really Secret Christians?Is it possible that hundreds of Japanese Samurai were actually secret Christians who expressed their faith with codes hidden in their sword hilts? As far as the new findings of The Sawada Miki Kinenkan museum in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan are concerned, the answer is "yes."

Rarely-seen Samurai Weaponry Finally Goes On Display

Rarely-Seen Samurai Weaponry Finally Goes on DisplayMost people think of samurai as fierce swordsmen attuned to violence, but the artifacts currently on display in Samurai: The Way of the Warrior at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville reveal a commitment to impeccable craftsmanship as well as deadly force. On loan from the Museo Stibbert in Florence, Italy, the exhibition boasts a priceless collection of ceremonial suits of armor, handscrolls, katanas (swords), and other samurai-related relics rarely seen outside of Japan.

Usj Set To Stage Samurai Era Spectacle Using Osaka Castle

USJ set to stage samurai era spectacle using Osaka CastleUniversal Studios Japan is set to hold its first outdoor spectacular away from the theme park here with a dazzling show about the siege of Osaka Castle in the 17th century.
USJ said the event, titled “Sengoku the Real at Osaka Castle,” will involve images beamed on to the walls of Osaka Castle as well as fireworks, music and live performances. It will run from December through March next year.

Samurai Hustle Returns

Samurai Hustle ReturnsMasaatsu Naito (Kuranosuke Sasaki) successfully completes Sankin-kotai (required ritual to visit the shogun). On his way home, he hears that an insurrection by peasants has taken place in his hometown of Yunagaya. Masaatsu Naito knows that it is a counterattack by Matsudaira. He returns to Yunagaya, but finds that his castle is gone.

Okita Soji

Okita SojiOkita Sōji, (1842 or 1844 – July 19, 1868) was the captain of the first unit of the Shinsengumi, a special police force in Kyoto during the late shogunate period. He was one of the best swordsmen of the Shinsengumi.

Otomo Sorin

Otomo SorinŌtomo Sōrin (January 31, 1530 – June 11, 1587), also known as Fujiwara no Yoshishige and Ōtomo Yoshishige, was a Japanese feudal lord (daimyo) of the Ōtomo clan, one of the few to have converted to Roman Catholicism (Christianity). The eldest son of Ōtomo Yoshiaki, he inherited the Funai Domain, on Kyūshū, Japan's southernmost main island, from his father. He is perhaps most significant for having appealed to Toyotomi Hideyoshi to intervene in Kyūshū against the Shimazu clan, thus spurring Hideyoshi's Kyūshū Campaign of 1587.

Ota Dokan

Ota DokanŌta Dōkan (1432 - August 25, 1486), also known as Ōta Sukenaga or Ōta Dōkan Sukenaga, was a Japanese samurai warrior-poet, military tactician and Buddhist monk. Ōta Sukenaga took the tonsure (bald scalp) as a Buddhist priest in 1478, and he also adopted the Buddhist name, Dōkan, by which he is known today. Dōkan is best known as the architect and builder of Edo Castle (now the Imperial Palace) in what is today modern Tokyo; and he is considered the founder of the castle town which grew up around that Ōnin era fortress.

Ooka Tadasuke

Ooka TadasukeŌoka Tadasuke (1677 – February 3, 1752) was a Japanese samurai in the service of the Tokugawa shogunate. During the reign of Tokugawa Yoshimune, as a magistrate (machi-bugyō) of Edo, his roles included chief of police, judge and jury, and Yamada Magistrate (Yamada bugyō) prior to his tenure as South Magistrate (Minami Machi-bugyō) of Edo.

Okada Izo

Okada IzoOkada Izō ( February 14, 1838 – June 3, 1865) was a Japanese samurai of the late Edo period, feared as one of the four most notable assassins of the Bakumatsu period. He was born in Tosa to the gōshi Okada Gihei, who had been a peasant but had bought the gōshi rank. Izō and Tanaka Shinbei were active in Kyoto as assassins under the leadership of Takechi Hanpeita.

Oishi Yoshio

Oishi YoshioŌishi Yoshio ( April 24, 1659 – March 20, 1703) was the chamberlain (karō) of the Akō Domain in Harima Province (now Hyōgo Prefecture), Japan (1679 - 1701). He is known as the leader of the Forty-seven Ronin in their 1702 vendetta and thus the hero of the Chūshingura. He is often referred to by his title, Ōishi Kuranosuke.

Ogasawara Shosai

Ogasawara ShosaiOgasawara Shōsai (died 1600) is most famous for killing Hosokawa Gracia to protect her honor when Ishida Mitsunari attempted to take her hostage. Afterwards he and the rest of the household then committed seppuku and burned their mansion down.