2020 Toyota Camry Trd First Drive Review | Driving Impressions, Specs, Photos

2020 Toyota Camry TRD First Drive Review | Driving impressions, specs, photos

DALLAS, Tex. — Autocrossing a Toyota Camry shouldn't be fun … should it? Everyone knows a Camry is best enjoyed from the rear seat, while your Uber driver chauffeurs you home after a night at the bar. Or at least, that has historically been the case. But Toyota's mainstay sedan has evolved into a car that also can be appreciated from behind the wheel, and buyers appear to be taking notice. Since the latest-generation Camry debuted for 2018, the SE and XSE models combined have accounted for some 60% of the model mix, according to Toyota. But the 2020 Toyota Camry TRD moves beyond those models, taking the Camry to a place it has never credibly gone before: a coned autocross course. The brand's in-house tuner arm, TRD (Toyota Racing Development), has to date mostly expended its energies making trucks and SUVs more off-road ready. TRD-branded models include the 4Runner, Tacoma, Tundra, and Sequoia. In creating the 2020 Camry TRD, the first TRD-branded sedan, the primary objective was to improve handling. Of course, the car also has to look the part. There's the rear wing — a Camry first — but also side aero skirts in black with red striping, extended front splitters, and a diffuser under the rear bumper. A gloss-black grille, special matte-black wheels, and a black roof complete the look. Exterior colors are limited to black, red, pearl white, and silver. Sorry, no beige. Inside, drivers are treated to red accents before they get the red mist. The TRD Camry's black interior sees red stripes on the seats and a red "TRD" stitched into the headrests. There also are red seatbelts; red edging on the floor mats; and red contrast stitching on the dash, steering wheel, gear lever, and shift boot. The gauge numbers also are red. The Camry is one of the final holdouts still offering a V6 engine in a class that has increasingly downsized and added turbocharging, and that engine is unchanged for TRD duty, making the same 301 horsepower and 267 lb-ft of torque as it does in the XSE and XLE models. It does, however, get a revised cat-back exhaust system to trumpet more engine sound. A stiffer structure always benefits handling, and the TRD folks have added a V-brace behind the Camry's rear seatback (sacrificing its fold-down function). Additionally, three under-car braces have been beefed up. The revised suspension features firmer coil springs and dampers and beefier anti-roll bars, all employed in a quest for increased roll stiffness. The dampers also gain internal rebound springs, and there are new jounce bumpers to preserve some semblance of ride quality. The new setup lowers the ride height by 0.6 inch, which pays ancillary benefits in the visual department. Toyota's Active Cornering Assist, which can brake an inside wheel in turns, is employed here and is exclusive to the TRD. The Camry TRD dons a set of athletic footwear in the form of model-specific 19 x 8.5" alloy wheels that are half-an-inch wider and 3.1 pounds lighter than the 19" units on the XSE. For maximum stick, they're wrapped with Bridgestone Potenza summer tires, size 235/40. Peeking through the matte-black wheels are snappy, red-painted brake calipers. The fronts have been upgraded to two-piston units (the rears are unchanged), and they squeeze 0.9-inch-larger rotors. We drove the TRD back-to-back with the next-sportiest Camry variant, the V6 XSE. In a tight coned course, the TRD exhibited far more grip, body control, and eagerness to turn in. Where the XSE just wanted to push, the TRD was less prone to understeer and ultimately felt more balanced. It also stayed more planted in quick transitions and was much more resistant to body roll. The car actually was fun to toss around. We also made time to drive the Camry TRD on the street, where the difference versus the XSE model was less transformative but still evident. The TRD car has retuned electric power steering, and that combined with the different (although same-size) tires makes for improved steering feel, with the helm noticeably more precise on center. It's best appreciated in Sport mode, which reduces steering assist compared to Normal mode. Cruising through a couple of fast sweepers, this Camry feels athletic, and isn't terribly upset by bumps. The roads north of Dallas were generally pretty smooth, but crossing a set a railroad tracks we did feel some impact harshness, and we suspect that over broken pavement the TRD's firmer suspension will exact a toll in ride quality. As noted, TRD left the Camry's powertrain alone except for the exhaust system, but this V6 makes about as much as you'd want to send through the front wheels anyway. The Camry steps lively off the line, but with peak torque arriving at 4,700 rpm, the engine unsurprisingly provides its most muscular response as the tach needle swings toward 5k. With the revised exhaust, this vociferous V6 sounds better than any 2.0-liter turbo four at higher revs. But there is also a bit of not-so-welcome resonance when cruising at a steady 50 to 60 mph, although it's pretty faint, taking a back seat to the noise from the Bridgestones. In all other ways, this is a Camry, which means it has a roomy interior, comfortable front seats, and good outward visibility. It has the same funhouse dashboard with its slashing curves, agreeable mechanical shifter, and fairly simple infotainment system as its siblings. The TRD-specific Softex fabric does a reasonable approximation of leather, and the red elements are sporty without being cheesy – but the red instrument markings are hard to see when wearing sunglasses. With a starting price of $31,995 (with destination), the TRD is the lowest-priced Camry with a V6 engine. It comes in $3,410 below the V6 XLE and $3,960 less than the V6 XSE. That may seem surprising, but the TRD's equipment level is more akin to the four-cylinder SE model. Thus, the TRD skips the sunroof, leather, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and larger touchscreen with navigation that are all standard on the XSE and XLE V6 models. Among the included features are adaptive cruise control with automatic emergency braking, lane-departure warning, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and a 7-inch touchscreen infotainment system with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. Toyota says that production of the 2020 Camry TRD is limited but seems not to have settled on an exact number. We're told that fewer than 6,000 will be built. It would be a shame if at least a few of them don't find their way to an autocross.

Canon Eos M6 Mark Ii Specs Leaked In Promotional Video

Canon EOS M6 Mark II Specs Leaked In Promotional Video

It appears that despite Canon pushing forwards with its new EOS R lineup of full-frame mirrorless cameras, the company is still interested in maintaining its EOS M lineup of mirrorless cameras. This is according to a report from Canon Rumors who spotted a leaked promotional video from Canon, advertising the EOS M6 Mark II.

Thanks to the leaked video, we know that the company is indeed working on the camera and now we also have an idea of what kind of specs we can expect. This includes the use of a 32.5MP APS-C sensor, the use of the DIGIC 8 image processor, 14fps shooting speeds, a RAW burst rate of up to 30fps, and an ISO range of 26,500, eye-detection AF, AF capable of stepping down to -5 EV, 4K video shooting, and also Full HD video shooting at 120fps. There will also be a removable OLED viewfinder.

2020 Acura Rdx Review And Buying Guide | Specs, Features, Photos, Impressions - Autoblog

2020 Acura RDX Review and Buying Guide | Specs, features, photos, impressions - Autoblog

The 2020 Acura RDX is a bold compact luxury crossover that represents a return to its roots – providing some athleticism and adrenaline to a segment not known for either. We think this is a positive development, as the previous RDX lost its way a bit. However, that last RDX's biggest strength was its very spacious interior for its overall size, which carries over to the new version despite the increased athleticism. These aren't usually attributes that go together; sporty vehicles can be smaller, with poor space utilization. That isn't the case here. The turbocharged engine and advanced all-wheel drive system mean the RDX is as lively as any crossover buyer could want. The bottom line is that it has more character and a superior combination of attributes than many of its sport-luxury competitors.

What's new with for 2020?

The RDX carries over mostly unchanged for 2020 after receiving a complete redesign last year. There's a turbocharged engine under the hood again, instead of the V6 in the last-generation model, and the technologically-advanced Super-Handling All-Wheel Drive system also makes a return. On the outside, the chrome grille "beak" has thankfully vanished, and there's some nifty tech in the slick interior – although its signature touchpad infotainment controller is a mixed bag. More on that below. You can read about last year's changes more fully in our 2019 Acura RDX First Drive, but in short, it's sportier, more distinctive and more luxurious than its predecessor. Part of that is the fact it's no longer based on the same vehicle platform as Honda's CR-V.  

2020 4runner First Drive Review | Photos, Specs, Impressions - Autoblog

2020 4Runner First Drive Review | Photos, specs, impressions - Autoblog

MOAB, Utah – I'd love to put random SUV owners inside the 2020 Toyota 4Runner, and point them toward the console lever inside. No, not that one, the familiar automatic transmission lever – I'm talking about the stubby, silver-capped lever positioned around two o'clock. It's the transfer case selector, of course, but I'm wondering what percentage of today's crossover owners would know what to do with it, or what "L4" stands for. Toyota must have thought the same thing, because they put together a brief video tutorial for the 4Runner's manually operated, two-speed transfer case. It lets you shift the truck between two- and four-wheel-drive (at speeds below 50 mph); or to its low-range 4WD for low-speed rock crawling, driving in soft sand – or wherever you want, frankly. Yanking that high-effort lever into L4 – don't forget to stop and shift the transmission lever into Neutral first – is essential on the beautiful desolation of the Hell's Revenge trail, a slick rock jaunt in Moab. The Toyota's outstanding Crawl Control can automatically trigger brakes at individual wheels to walk you up or down hills with no human throttle or brake inputs, if those inclines seem beyond a driver's skill grade. By now, serious off-roaders – can I get a show of dirty hands? – are rolling their eyes and asking why I'm bothering to explain the obvious. But that's the point: The 4Runner, and vehicles like it, were once synonymous with the SUV: a steel-frame, truck-based vehicle with genuine four-wheel-drive. Today, the 4Runner is a niche vehicle, including features and capabilities that can seem odd or superfluous to the crossover-driving masses. If your lifestyle and geography favors off-road adventure, the 2020 4Runner is as charming and trustworthy as ever. If your lifestyle leans toward commuting, family chauffeuring, or road trips on the Interstate, well, let's put it charitably: The 4Runner is not the ideal tool for the job. Besides the inherent detriments common to truck-based SUVs, the 4Runner was last full redesigned for 2010. As such, its ride and handling, interior and fuel economy especially (you won't see 20 mpg on a bet) have fallen behind the competitive curve. To address some – but not all – issues, Toyota has mildly updated this 2020 version. Grilles are slightly revised, in part to accommodate a new front radar sensor for the previously unavailable but now standard Toyota Safety Sense Plus suite of accident avoidance features: automated emergency braking with pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control, automated high beams and lane-departure alert with trailer sway control. The 4Runner also adds new wheel designs, including the TRD Pro's black 17-inch TRD alloys with Nitto Terra Grappler tires. That top of the line trim can also now be had in "Army Green" paint, which like 2019's Voodoo Blue, was last seen on the FJ Cruiser. Toyota says the resurrected Army Green "will bring out your inner drill sergeant." Preferably not this drill sergeant. Inside, a new driver's instrument panel is more handsome and informative, including a chrono-style speedometer and tach. Toyota has also managed to shoehorn in its 8-inch touchscreen infotainment system, which comes with Apple CarPlay, Android Auto or Alexa. The 4Runner previously had a tiny 6.1-inch touchscreen and none of those smartphone connectivity features. Should you choose a TRD Pro or Limited model, the new system adds a 15-speaker, 550-watt JBL audio unit. In another nod to modernity, back-seat riders get a new pair of USB ports that fans have been demanding (the old 4Runner had one). Proximity entry with push button start also becomes standard on nearly all models. Mechanically, the TRD Pro adds a cat-back exhaust system with a slightly huskier growl. Though it's questionable whether anyone really needs to hear the 4Runner's ancient, 4.0-liter V6 groan its way to high revs. That V6 delivers an unchanged 270 horsepower and 278 pound-feet of torque. Toyota says it's good for a 0-60 mph run in a reasonable 7.5 seconds, which is a touch quicker than a burly Dodge Durango with its 293-hp V6. Unfortunately, the five-speed automatic transmission remains on hand from Toyota's old soldier's home. In theory, the shift lever's manual function should make things snappier, but the 4Runner's transmission often ignores downshift commands, with annoyingly tardy upshifts in manual mode. While the 4Runner remains roomy and relatively comfortable, it's looking as tired your grandpa's Barcalounger. Inside, plastic imitates seemingly every conceivable natural material: There's plastic that looks like leather, plastic as rubber, plastic as metal or carbon fiber. Fold the seats, including the optional, child-sized third row (only on SR5 and Limited models), and the 4Runner can swallow an expedition's worth of gear. Its maximum capacity of 90 cubic feet is actually comparable to three-row midsize crossovers, although it does have a higher liftover. As noted, nothing announces the 4Runner's authenticity like the manly-man transfer case once found on every four-wheeler. (You might crawl beneath the TRD Pro version to spot its 2.5-inch-diameter Fox shocks, or its expanded skidplates, but that would take more effort). Today, even most Jeeps (or the 2020 Toyota Tacoma pickup we tested at Moab) have replaced manual transfer cases with electronic knobs or switches, which are easier to operate but not nearly as tactile and cool. Toyota's Multi-Terrain Select system and Crawl Control are still operated with knobs, though they're oddly located on the ceiling forward of the rearview mirror. With all the above off-roading weapons loaded, the 4Runner proves to still have the Right Stuff, from the Flintstones-like landscapes of Moab, which instantly expose any SUV poseur, to hours on dirt roads through the high passes of the LaSal and San Juan ranges toward Ouray, Colorado. And it wouldn't be a Toyota review without a fond mention of the 4Runner's reputation for bulletproof reliability: It's something that could save your relationship, or your bacon, on lonely trails and in the wilderness. Realizing that we've spent most of the past two days on boulders, sand and dirt-roostertail roads, I take a pre-dinner solo run from Ouray on actual pavement. On these everyday roads, there's just no getting around the 4Runner's antiquated state: The placeholder powertrain, the sloppy and disconnected steering, the way the 4Runner wanders in its lane. It's here that 4x4 fans may do a facepalm, and say something like, "C'mon! It's an off-road truck. What did you expect, a Bentley?" Sure, the Toyota's off-road chops help explain its on-road shortcomings, but no longer excuses them here in 2020. For proof, look no further than the latest Jeep Wrangler, the (also aging) Grand Cherokee, or at higher price points, any Land Rover or the Mercedes G-Class. That Wrangler JL's all-new (cough, cough) design has proven that even a hardcore off-roader can achieve a respectable level of civility. While the current 4Runner is more livable than the Wrangler, considering how far that Jeep has come, couldn't Toyota do better? Toyota hasn't divulged pricing for the 2020 4Runner that goes on sale this fall, but cost increases should be negligible. For reference, a rear-drive, 2019 SR model starts from $36,405, while the TRD Pro goes for $47,910. Analysts' crystal balls do see Toyota bringing an all-new 4Runner to showrooms, finally, around 2022. It seems likely that the 4Runner can withstand market pressures until that sixth-generation model arrives, especially with its antiquated infotainment and missing safety tech features being corrected for 2020. Its market niche is also showing surprising endurance, thanks in part to Americans' increasing demand for SUVs with authentic design and rugged personality. This old soldier actually sold nearly 100,000 more units in 2018 than it did when it was brand new in 2010.   Still, if you couldn't care less about four-wheeling and have no idea what that other shifter does, you might wait for another SUV that's also tripled its sales since 2009: The Toyota Highlander, whose all-new 2020 version goes on sale late this year. Choose that family favorite over the more purpose-built 4Runner, and Toyota won't mind a bit.

2019 Infiniti Qx50 Essential Review | Features, Specs And More - Autoblog

2019 Infiniti QX50 Essential Review | Features, Specs and More - Autoblog

The 2019 Infiniti QX50 is the brand's second smallest crossover, and it's fully redesigned for the 2019 model year. Infiniti decided to use the stylish QX50 as a technology flagship, specifically using it to debut its variable-compression engine technology. It has since been shared with Nissan in the new Altima, but Infiniti got the new 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder first. It makes a solid 268 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque, numbers that are very similar to the outgoing QX50's 3.7-liter V6. However, the 2019 QX50 with all-wheel drive (as our tester is equipped) nets you 26 mpg combined to the old car's 20 mpg combined rating. Infiniti pairs the new engine with its continuously-variable transmission. We happen to be testing the absolute pinnacle of what a QX50 can be: the "Essential" trim level. The base QX50 Pure starts at $37,645, whereas ours towers up to $59,085. That steep price is thanks to the addition of several high-dollar packages, including the $7,500 Sensory Package. This is the price you'll pay to get the ultra-luxe interior that we happened to fall in love with. The Autograph Package added $2,000, netting us white leather with the blue suede accents. Then the ProActive ($2,000) and ProAssist ($550) packages provide all the advanced driver assistance features like ProPilot Assist. Take note that the frustrating steer-by-wire (DAS) system is also included in the ProActive Package. Assistant Editor, Zac Palmer: When fully optioned as our QX50 Essential tester is, this interior can mix it up with the best in the business. You may have to sell a kidney to afford it, but the quilted white semi-aniline leather, soft blue suede and light maple (real) wood is going to make it all worthwhile. Infiniti certainly nailed it on the materials, but the interior design and styling flourishes are executed just as successfully. There's a simplicity to the flatness and gently curving horizontal lines that feels so graceful and luxurious. I feel that I'd never tire of the cream, brown and blue color combination, though that light-colored leather means I'd forever be trying extra hard to keep it clean. All of this interior loveliness was almost enough to make me forget about this crossover's interior tech shortcomings. Infiniti hasn't integrated Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, and the stock infotainment system isn't nearly polished enough to warrant such an omission. I'm no fan of Infiniti's unusual stacked dual-screen setup, and the newest infotainment systems from the Germans are far more advanced. Even when connected via Bluetooth, the QX50 was unable to tell me the name of the song and artist that was currently streaming from my phone. At least I thoroughly enjoyed that sound quality from the 16-speaker Bose Performance Series speakers. If you're able to overlook the tech issues, then spending time in the most expensive of QX50s becomes a luxury experience right at the top of its class.

Was a bit shocked at how nice the interior can get on a fully-loaded @INFINITIUSA QX50. The quilted stitching, blue suede and brown leather all play together rather nicely. But where's Android Auto and Apple CarPlay? @therealautoblog pic.twitter.com/gaGpFWpUXy — Zac Palmer (@zacpalmerr) June 20, 2019 Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: I enjoyed my weekend in the QX50. The VC Turbo engine, a finalist for the 2019 Autoblog Tech of the Year Award, sounds good and has plenty of pull. A compact crossover with 280 lb-ft of torque and all-wheel drive feels right. The 268-hp output is middling, but the torque more than makes up for it. The four-cylinder engine is achieving efficacy in the car business. We see it used in everything from sports cars to full-size trucks and it's working. Infiniti spent a lot of time and money developing the VC (Variable Compression) Turbo and it's giving a vehicles throughout the brand's lineup a new energy. Like Zac says, the interior is gorgeous. It's quiet, well-laid out, comfortable and near the top of the class. The only issue I have is with the infotainment. It's fine, but the controls and workflow are a bit nebulous. Associate Editor Joel Stocksdale: Zac and Greg went over the best parts of the QX50, so I guess I get to talk about the less stellar ride and handling. The ride itself is fairly good, very smooth and isolating, but handling is pretty disappointing. There's a fair amount of body roll, and not a lot of grip. You wouldn't know that through the steering wheel, though, which is connected to Infiniti's steer-by-wire system known as "Direct Adaptive Steering." It's feather-light and completely uncommunicative. But on the plus side, it doesn't feel nearly as disconcertingly disconnected as Infiniti's past steer-by-wire iterations. Maybe one day it will finally feel decent. Or maybe Infiniti will wise up and just stick to a direct physical connection between the wheel and the steering rack. At least it's an option, so you can skip if you want (and trust me, you do want). All this being said, if you're just looking for something comfortable to get you from A to B, this isn't a big issue, and the engine's impressive power, the Autograph package's spectacular interior, and reasonable pricing for this size of crossover, all make a compelling case for the QX50.

2019 Honda Hr-v Review | Price, Specs, Features And Photos - Autoblog

2019 Honda HR-V Review | Price, specs, features and photos - Autoblog

The 2019 Honda HR-V is one of the most space-efficient SUVs, managing to provide far more passenger and cargo space than you'd think possible from its diminutive exterior dimensions. If getting the most out of the least is important to you, the HR-V is going to make a lot of sense. It also boasts a reasonable price given that size plus a high-quality interior, ample feature content (especially the EX trim) and Honda's legendary reliability. Even its crash scores were improved for 2019 along with a number of other elements described below. The HR-V has a lot going for it, but it's certainly not a slam dunk. Acceleration is among the slowest in the segment, and you don't need a stopwatch to notice. Its all-wheel-drive system isn't particularly sophisticated and isn't a great choice if you'll be dealing with deep snow or mud. Taller drivers are also unlikely to be comfortable in the driver seat, which has insufficient travel in all but the top Touring trim. As such, we'd recommend also considering the Subaru Crosstrek, Hyundai Kona or even the Kia Niro Hybrid.

What's new for 2019?

The HR-V gets its first significant update this year. The styling has been tweaked, but it's minor. New Sport and Touring trim levels debut, bringing with them distinctive styling and noteworthy features (the Touring includes a sorely needed power driver seat). The top three trim levels now come standard with the Honda Sensing suite of accident avoidance technologies, which were previously unavailable on the HR-V. IIHS crash scores have also improved. As in other updated 2019 Hondas, the touchscreen interface gets a volume knob and some other updates. In terms of the oily bits, you can no longer get the HR-V with a manual transmission, which no one should be particularly concerned about. Happily, the CVT has apparently been retuned to be more refined than before.

What's the HR-V's interior and in-car technology like?

The HR-V's cabin is distinctive in the Honda SUV family as it skews a little more toward form than function. The rising "floating" center console that can be wrapped in padded simulated leather looks great, as do the unique touch-operated climate controls. Materials quality is excellent for this budget segment, and in general, we think this one of the more attractive and well-made interiors in the segment. The same cannot be said for its infotainment system. Sure, Honda added a volume knob to the available touchscreen for 2019, but that omission wasn't the system's only flaw. It's still a bit slow, and the menu structure convoluted. You only need to look inside an Accord to see what Honda infotainment is capable of. Along with that touchscreen, all but the base LX trim come with two USB ports (inconveniently located under that floating center console), Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and a variety of smartphone apps through HondaLink.

How big is the HR-V?

If you're looking for a sub-compact SUV (or at least an inexpensive SUV) with the most interior space possible, it's hard to beat the HR-V. It features the same "Magic Seat" as the Honda Fit – with the gas tank under the front seat, the back seat can fold completely flat into the super-low floor – affording it unmatched space and versatility. There's a best-in-class 24.3 cubic-feet with the seats raised (FWD) and 57.6 cubic-feet with them lowered. Only the Nissan Kicks comes remotely close to that. The Magic Seat's 60/40-split bottom also flips up, allowing you to store things across an ultra-long rear footwell. Up front, those of above-average height will struggle to get comfortable behind the wheel due to a driver seat that doesn't slide far enough back or dip far enough down. There is thankfully an eight-way power driver seat available for 2019 that should at least partially rectify this, but it's exclusive to the top trip level. Outside, the HR-V is 169.1 inches long, which is pretty much mid-pack for the segment, falling in between the bigger Subaru Crosstrek and smaller Hyundai Kona. Its 63.2-inch height is typical for the segment, and its ground clearance is modest at 7.3 inches with front-wheel drive and 6.7 inches with all-wheel drive. That's actually as good or better than many competitors, but also not well suited to actually venturing off the beaten path (its unsophisticated all-wheel-drive system doesn't help on that front, either).

What's the HR-V's performance and fuel economy?

The situation under the HR-V's hood is pretty simple. Every version comes with a 1.8-liter inline-four that produces 141 horsepower and 127 pound-feet of torque, one of the lowest outputs in the segment. Front-wheel drive and a continuously variable transmission (CVT) are standard, while all-wheel drive is an option. The front-drive HR-V returns an estimated 28 mpg city, 34 mph highway and 30 mpg combined, making it one of the thriftiest in the segment. All-wheel drive lowers those estimates to 26/31/28 in most trim levels with the LX basically getting 1 mpg better. 

What's the HR-V like to drive?

The HR-V is very slow. Honda says it improved the sluggish responses of the CVT for 2019, and although we haven't yet sampled this change, we doubt it'll do much to help one of the weakest engines in the segment. This is a shame, since Honda has much better engines at its disposal. It's also a shame since the HR-V is otherwise a competent little SUV to drive. Corners are taken with relative poise and the steering is precise. Meanwhile, ride comfort is better than most as are wind and road noise.

What more can I read about the Honda HR-V?

2019 Honda HR-V: More trims, higher prices, no manual

Our breakdown of what's new for the 2019 Honda HR-V.

2019 Nissan Murano Drivers' Notes Review | Price, Specs, Features And Photos - Autoblog

2019 Nissan Murano Drivers' Notes Review | Price, specs, features and photos - Autoblog

The 2019 Nissan Murano is one of six crossovers or SUVs in Nissan's ever expanding lineup. This third-gen model hit showrooms back in 2015 and received a minor update for 2019 focused mainly on appearance. Like its predecessors, the current Murano is a stylish offering compared to models like the Rogue and Pathfinder, much the same way the Maxima relates to the Altima sedan. It may seem odd to have so many models right on top of each other in terms of size and price, but Americans bought more than 87,000 Muranos in 2018, an increase of 8.9 percent over 2017. That said, sales are down significantly through June 2019. As before, power comes from a version of Nissan's long-running VQ engine line. This 3.5-liter V6 makes 260 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque, sending power to all four wheels through a continuously-variable transmission. Front-wheel drive is standard. Our fully-loaded Platinum model comes with niceties like leather seats with diamond-quilted inserts, ventilated front seats, heated seats both front and rear, a heated steering wheel, dual-zone climate control, LED lighting, a Bose audio system, and a 8-inch infotainment system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. A base front-wheel-drive Murano S starts at $32,415 with our Murano Platinum tester coming in at $46,420. Assistant Editor Zac Palmer: The Murano is a crossover that isn't confused about its purpose as a comfortable daily driver, but it also doesn't offer anything special to set it apart from the other mid-sizers. Perhaps the most distinctive part about it is the design, yet it's no more eye-catching than similarly stylish competitors like the Edge, Passport and Blazer. In fact, the Murano looks more like a generic crossover than any of those. Comfort is the priority in all facets, and that's probably the way it should be for the buyer Nissan is after here. The semi-aniline leather seats were big pillows that were shockingly great to sit in. There's a dedicated leather pad for your right knee to rest against that is greatly appreciated. Then the armrests on both sides are positioned just right for relaxed driving, soaking up the highway miles. The center armrest actually has a little split in the cushions that acts as a neat little nook/resting place for your elbow and arm. Some may dislike it, but I found that it worked for me. These may seem like no-brainer, small things, but the Murano nails it all, and not every car does. As for the rest of the interior … Nissan has some work to do. Even though this crossover was ever-so-slightly refreshed for 2019, it doesn't feel it on the inside. A clashing mashup of fake wood and silver trim muck up the dash in an attempt at looking luxurious. I appreciate all the physical buttons to control the climate settings and radio, but the steering wheel buttons are incredibly ill-conceived. The most-used control — volume up and down — is just out of your thumb's reach, meaning you have to physically take your hand off the steering wheel to press them. At that point the knob close to your right hand on the dash is easier to use. Then the cruise control "Cancel" button is a difficult stretch at the top on the right side. Pretty much everybody else makes these buttons usable without any sort of trouble like this, so Nissan really needs to get that layout changed. Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: I've always liked the looks of the Nissan Murano, and in Platinum trim, this thing is blinged out. I give Nissan credit for really going for it with this sometimes polarizing design. Nissan made the Murano, which was always quirky, into a sleek, futuristic design for the 2015 model year. I think they've pulled it off better than companies like Hyundai and Ford, which have also tried similarly aggressive styles with mixed results. The Murano's prominent grille, angled headlights and long hood make a statement, while the chiseled beltline and raked roofline keep the design mojo going from stem to stern. Some think the Murano is a bit much. It probably is, but it's a risk-taking design in a crowded segment. Road Test Editor Reese Counts: Like so much of Nissan's current lineup, I forgot about the Murano about 10 minutes after I got out of it. It looks ... interesting? I don't know. I don't hate it, but I sure don't love it either. It's certainly more distinct than some of Nissan's other crossovers, but I'm not sure if that's a plus or minus. I do like the engine, or at least I like the power. With everyone going to downsized turbocharged inline-fours, it's good to see Nissan sticking with a naturally-aspirated V6. The VQ is a little uncouth, but I don't think most buyers will mind. Power is relatively smooth, though the CVT saps any bit of joy from the driving experience. It's fine I guess, but, like the Maxima, I don't know or understand who is buying these things. 

Rumored Fujifilm X-pro3 Specs Hint At In-body Image Stabilization

Rumored Fujifilm X-Pro3 Specs Hint At In-Body Image Stabilization

Back in 2016, Fujifilm launched one of their latest flagship mirrorless cameras in the form of the X-Pro2. We imagine that following the success of their X-Pro series of cameras amongst those who prefer the rangefinder style, Fujifilm will probably at some point in the future launch the X-Pro3.

Now according to a report from Fuji Addict, they claim to have heard from a source who has since revealed some of the alleged specs of the X-Pro3. This includes the use of a 24MP/26.1MP X-Trans CMOS sensor, the X-processor 4 that comes with a quad CPU, the ability to record 4K video at 60fps, and also weather sealing in a magnesium alloy body.

These Are The Rumored Specs Of The Canon Eos 90d

These Are The Rumored Specs Of The Canon EOS 90D

While mirrorless cameras are all the rage these days, we understand that there might be some photographers who still prefer the heft, size, and features of a DSLR. If you’re looking for a new DSLR and want something less expensive than a professional-grade camera but want something better than an entry-level device, then Canon might have something for you.

According to a report from Canon Rumors, they have managed to get their hands on the alleged specs of the upcoming Canon EOS 90D. This is the successor to the EOS 80D which was launched back in 2016, which means that now is as good a time as any for Canon to introduce a new camera to its mid-range lineup.

Alleged Olympus Tg-6 Rugged Compact Camera Specs Leaked

Alleged Olympus TG-6 Rugged Compact Camera Specs Leaked

The thing about cameras is that some of them can be quite fragile. This means that using them in extreme weather conditions or settings might not be the best idea. However, Olympus has over the years released cameras part of its Tough TG lineup that have been designed to weather more extreme conditions.

If you liked what the company had to offer with the Tough TG-5 from 2017, then you’ll be pleased to learn that the company could be close to officially announcing its successor. Thanks to the folks at Photo Rumors, they have managed to get their hands on alleged specs of the upcoming camera.

Specs And Pictures Of All Xperia Phones Expected At Mwc 2019 Leaked

Specs and pictures of all Xperia phones expected at MWC 2019 leaked

So if there was any doubt as to what would be announced on Monday at MWC in Barcelona, then you can feast your eyes on the full line up below. 91mobiles have leaked all phones expected to be announced, including the flaghship Xperia 1, the Xperia 10 and 10 Plus mid-rangers, as well as the value-oriented Xperia L3. However, as well as the images, the site has also got full specification details of each phone.

Sony Xperia L3 Specs And Renders Leaked

Sony Xperia L3 Specs And Renders Leaked

MWC is coming up soon which means that we can probably expect to see new phones from a variety of companies. One of those companies is Sony who according to the rumors, have some new handsets for us. However if you’re more interested in the company’s low or mid-range offerings, then they could have something for you as well.

In a post on WinFuture.de, it seems that the upcoming Sony Xperia L3 handset has been leaked. From what we can tell, this is a low-to-mid range handset where the rumored specs include a 5.7-inch 1440×720 display. The handset will also feature 3GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, and it will also be retaining the 3.5mm headphone jack for those who aren’t a fan of dongles or Bluetooth headsets.

Alleged Fujifilm Gfx 50r Specs Leaked, Rumored For September 25

Alleged Fujifilm GFX 50R Specs Leaked, Rumored For September 25

A couple of years ago Fujifilm launched the GFX 50S which marked the company’s first foray into the medium format business. Now fast forward two years later, it seems that the company has plans for a successor because in a report from Fuji Rumors, they are claiming that Fujifilm will be making an announcement on the 25th of September.