Toyota Patents In-car Fragrance System That Dispenses Tear Gas On Car Thieves

Toyota patents in-car fragrance system that dispenses tear gas on car thieves

Toyota is traditionally a conservative company when it comes to adopting new car technology, which makes this recent patent it filed all the more hilarious. Just like the headline says, the patent includes a system that will release tear gas into the car. The noxious gas is piped in when the vehicle detects an illegitimate engine start. Now if that's not the most metal thing you've seen out of Toyota in a long time (forever?) we're not sure what is.

This section of the patent is part of a larger scheme of patenting a fragrance system similar to Mercedes' where you can choose the scent you want pumped out of the air vents. It's a novel feature that can help cleanse the cabin of any unpleasant odors, but can get annoying with strong and prolonged use. Toyota's system would theoretically be more seamless and personable than anything currently on the market, because it's designed to automatically detect who is getting into the vehicle via their mobile device. It will then dispense that driver's preferred fragrance.

Ghosn's Case Shines Light On Japan's Harsh System Of 'hostage Justice'

Ghosn's case shines light on Japan's harsh system of 'hostage justice'

TOKYO — The high-profile case of ex-Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn has shone a light in Japan on what critics call "hostage justice," in which suspects can be held for months after arrest, but any reforms will likely be incremental and slow. Ghosn, a former titan of the global auto industry, who has French, Brazilian and Lebonese citizenship, was released on bail of 1 billion yen ($9 million) on Wednesday after being held for more than 100 days following his Nov. 19 arrest by prosecutors on suspicion of under-reporting his compensation. In a scenario common in Japan's justice system, Ghosn was arrested two more times on fresh suspicions, including aggravated breach of trust, each time allowing prosecutors to keep him in custody and interrogate him without his lawyers being present. The term "hostage justice" refers to holding the suspect in custody while pressing for the "ransom" of a confession. Ghosn's case has sparked harsh international criticism of Japan's justice system, in which 99.9 percent of people charged with crimes are convicted. "The affair was reported abroad and many Japanese know that the Japanese criminal justice system is not necessarily at a global standard," wrote former Tokyo District Court judge Takao Nakayama in the Nikkei business daily. "In that sense, the Tokyo prosecutors opened a Pandora's box," he wrote. The article was part of a full-page spread headlined "What should be fixed in Japan's 'hostage justice'." Granting bail after indictment and ahead of trial is rare for suspects who, like Ghosn, maintain their innocence, with the stated reason being fears the defendant would flee, tamper with evidence or seek to sway witnesses. Ghosn had to post $8.9 million bail and agree not only to stay in Japan but to having surveillance cameras placed at his residence and to limits on his mobile phone and computer use. His first two requests for bail were rejected. "I do think that this has made the whole system, that most Japanese on the street don't really know exists, much more visible and much more vulnerable to criticism," said Tokyo-based lawyer Stephen Givens. Domestic civil rights groups and lawyers including the Japan Federation of Bar Associations have long criticized a system they say gives too much power to prosecutors and is too reliant on confessions, some later found to have been forced and false.

Not much presumption of innocence

Ordinary citizens — and media — often equate arrest with guilt. "Japan is a country that respects authority, and I think most people assume that when somebody is arrested, that there's a reason for that," Givens said. "Media ... are of that view — although I do think that some of the mainstream media are beginning to ask questions and present other views." Prosecutors have defended the system. "Each country has its own culture and systems," said Shin Kukimoto, a deputy public prosecutor, at a news conference in December. "I'm not sure it's right to criticize other systems simply because they are different." High-profile cases involving forced confessions periodically attract public attention, although no outcry has been sustained. In a possible sign the issue was creeping onto the public radar even before Ghosn's arrest, a private broadcaster launched in 2016 a television drama called "99.9 Criminal Lawyers" about defense lawyers fighting the odds against acquittal. The title refers to the conviction rate. Still, there is caution over prospects for change. "I'm skeptical, and it depends on what you mean by 'change'," said Colin Jones, a law professor at Kyoto's Doshisha University. "Courts are institutionally subject to foreign pressure. The trend has been a gradual increase in the rejection of detention warrants, and we might see a trend toward incremental change," he said.

Android Q Might Bring A System-wide Dark Mode

Android Q Might Bring A System-Wide Dark Mode


Google has gradually been updating some of its core apps with a dark theme. It’s present in apps like YouTube, Messages, Google News, and even some parts of the Maps app. To some, it felt like Google was setting the stage for a system-wide dark mode in Android and it appears that the company might deliver it with Android Q, the next major version of its mobile platform.

A post by one Googler by the name of Lukasz Zbylut on the Chromium bug tracker raises the possibility that Android Q might finally bring a system-wide dark mode for the platform. The dark, more battery-friendly theme is widely appreciated so many users will be pleased if Google goes ahead with this.

Japan Starts New Satellite Positioning System

Japan starts new satellite positioning system

Japan has started its own version of a global positioning system. The new system uses 4 Michibiki satellites in orbit around the earth. The final one was launched in October of last year. They complement American GPS satellites. At least one of the satellites is always above Japan.

Signals from that satellite come from an angle that tends to prevent tall buildings getting in the way. Smartphones and car-navigation systems that can receive those signals will be able to show their positions more accurately and stably.

Sony Allows Psn Id Changes In System Software 6.10 Preview

Sony Allows PSN ID Changes In System Software 6.10 Preview

It was reported earlier this year that Sony might finally allow PlayStation owners to change PSN name. Gamers have longed for this ability but it has never been possible to do this. Sony started surveying users about the possibility of a new feature which would let them change PSN ID. PlayStation owners will now be delighted to hear that Sony is testing out PSN name changes if system software 6.10 preview.

New Nuclear Plant Screening System Tested

New nuclear plant screening system tested

Japan's nuclear watchdog has begun the trial run of a new system for inspecting nuclear power plants. It will be introduced in 2020.

The trial took place at the Ohi nuclear plant in Fukui Prefecture on Monday and was shown to the media.

Fujifilm Says A Full-frame System Doesn't Make Sense For Them Now

Fujifilm Says A Full-Frame System Doesn't Make Sense For Them Now

In the mirrorless camera market, Sony used to dominate the full-frame segment, but with entry from the likes of Nikon and Canon, their position is certainly threatened. It also seems to show how there is a growing interest in full-frame mirrorless systems, although this seems to be a market that Fujifilm is avoiding for now.