Japan Slams S.korea's Refusal Of Arbitration Talks

Japan slams S.Korea's refusal of arbitration talks

A senior Japanese government official has criticized South Korea for refusing to agree to an arbitration panel over a wartime labor dispute.

Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasutoshi Nishimura spoke to reporters on Wednesday, a day after a senior South Korean official said his country would reject Japan's request for an arbitration panel.

Japan Rejects S.korea Claim Over Export Curb Talks

Japan rejects S.Korea claim over export curb talks

Japanese trade officials have denied that their South Korean counterparts had demanded that Tokyo retract recently imposed export curbs.

The trade ministry officials made the assertion in a rare news conference on Saturday evening.

Us Diplomat Wants Talks To 'adjust' Japan Alliance

US diplomat wants talks to 'adjust' Japan alliance

A senior US State Department official for East Asia has expressed readiness to hold wide-ranging discussions on security cooperation with Japan.

David Stilwell is visiting Japan for the first time since becoming assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs last month. Stilwell spoke to NHK on Friday.

Japan, S.korea To Hold Talks On Trade Spat

Japan, S.Korea to hold talks on trade spat

Japan and South Korea will hold talks in Tokyo on Friday to discuss Japan's tightened curbs on exports of some materials to South Korea.

It will be the first meeting between the countries since Japan implemented the measure last week.

Trump And Xi Wrap Up Talks

Trump and Xi wrap up talks

The leaders of the world's two biggest economies --currently embroiled in a trade war-- have held a one-on-one meeting for the first time in nearly seven months.

The meeting in Osaka, Japan, started with the two leaders expressing their hopes for a productive outcome.

G20 Summit Talks Underway In Osaka

G20 summit talks underway in Osaka

World leaders are in Day 2 of the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan. They are looking at ways to narrow global inequality and tackle climate change.

The meeting's chair, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, stressed the need to reduce the wealth gap between developed and emerging countries.

First Day Of G20 Summit Talks Wraps Up

First day of G20 summit talks wraps up

Leaders from the world have wrapped up their first day of meetings at the G20 summit in the western Japanese city of Osaka.

Despite expressing concern over trade tensions, leaders appeared jovial during an initial meet-and-greet. But Japanese officials say many are worried about the risk to the global economy posed by ongoing disputes.

Abe Holds Bilateral Talks With Trump

Abe holds bilateral talks with Trump

World leaders are gathering in Osaka for the two-day G20 summit. Besides the formal sessions, bilateral talks between key leaders on the sidelines are also generating a lot of attention. One of them was Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's meeting with US President Donald Trump.

At the onset of the talks, Abe said, "I'd like to welcome President Trump to Osaka. This visit for G20 follows my visit to the United States in April, and the President's visit to Japan as a state guest in May. Such frequent mutual visit by the leaders of the two countries in such a short span of time is the evidence of how robust Japan-US alliance is. I'd like to express my gratitude once again last month, as the first state guest to Japan in the new era of Reiwa.

Ghosn, Kelly Attend Pre-trial Talks

Ghosn, Kelly attend pre-trial talks

Former Nissan Motor chairman Carlos Ghosn and his close aide Greg Kelly have attended pre-trial talks at the Tokyo District Court.

The carmaker and the two former executives have been indicted on suspicion of underreporting Ghosn's pay in the firm's securities reports.

Abe Holds Talks With Ayatollah Khamenei

Abe holds talks with Ayatollah Khamenei

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has met Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to help defuse regional tensions caused by the US withdrawal from the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement.

Abe and Khamenei held talks in Tehran for about an hour on Thursday morning. On the previous night, Abe met Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

Abe Talks With Trump Ahead Of Iran Visit

Abe talks with Trump ahead of Iran visit

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and US President Donald Trump have discussed the situation in the Middle East before Abe leaves for Iran.

During their phone call, Abe is believed to have told Trump he intends to urge Iran to ease tensions when he meets with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Nissan Didn't Have Much Say In Merger Talks, But It Had What Fca Wanted

Nissan didn't have much say in merger talks, but it had what FCA wanted

TOKYO — Nissan wasn't consulted on the proposed merger between its alliance partner Renault and Fiat Chrysler, but the Japanese automaker's reluctance to go along may have helped bring about the surprise collapse of the talks. While Nissan Motor Co. had a weaker bargaining position from the start, with its financial performance crumbling after the arrest last year of its star executive Carlos Ghosn, it still had as its crown jewel the technology of electric vehicles and hybrids that Fiat Chrysler wanted. The board of Renault, meeting Thursday, didn't get as far as voting on the proposal, announced last week, which would have created the world's third biggest automaker, trailing only Volkswagen AG of Germany and Japan's Toyota Motor Corp. When the French government, Renault's top shareholder with a 15% stake, asked for more time to convince Nissan, Fiat Chrysler Chairman John Elkann abruptly withdrew the offer. Although analysts say reviving the talks isn't out of the question, they say trust among the players appears to have been broken. "The other companies made the mistake of underestimating Nissan's determination to say, 'No,' " said Katsuya Takuechi, senior analyst at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities in Tokyo.

The Note, an electric car with a small gas engine to charge its battery, was Japan's No. 1 selling car, the first time in 50 years that a Nissan beat Toyota and Honda. Renault and Fiat Chrylser highlighted possible synergies that come from sharing parts and research costs as the benefits of the merger. But what Fiat Chrysler lacks and really wanted was what's called in the industry "electrification technology," Takeuchi said. With emissions regulations getting stricter around the world, having such technology is crucial. Yokohama-based Nissan makes the world's best-selling electric car Leaf. Its Note, an electric car equipped with a small gas engine to charge its battery, was Japan's No. 1 selling car for the fiscal year through March, the first time in 50 years that a Nissan model beat Toyota and Honda Motor Co. for that title. Nissan is also a leader in autonomous-driving technology, another area all the automakers are trying to innovate. "Although Nissan had no say, its cautionary stance on the merger ended up being very meaningful," Takeuchi said. Nissan has long resisted pressures from Renault for a full merger, and Japanese media reported that Renault had likely hoped its lobbying power would be boosted, if it had merged with Fiat Chrysler. But the collapse of the talks with Fiat Chrysler might mean Renault would merely focus even more on a merger with Nissan, the Asahi newspaper said Friday. Nissan Chief Executive Hiroto Saikawa told reporters late Thursday that he wanted time to find out what the Fiat Chrylser-Renault merger might mean for Nissan, calling it "moving to the next stage." He reiterated his reservations about a full merger with Renault, stressing Nissan must turn its business around first. Fiat Chrysler cited "political conditions in France" for withdrawing its offer to Renault. The French government said it had placed four conditions on the deal, and getting support from Nissan was the condition that wasn't met. The other conditions were to preserve French jobs and factories, respect the governance balance between Renault and Fiat Chrysler, and ensure participation in an electric battery initiative with Germany. Michelle Krebs, executive analyst at Autotrader in Detroit, acknowledged the proposed giant alliance had been complex. "No one ever expected it to be a cake walk to negotiate or execute," she said. "The only surprise is that it ended so soon."

Fca-renault Merger Talks: France Wants Job Guarantees And Nissan On Board

FCA-Renault merger talks: France wants job guarantees and Nissan on board

PARIS — France will seek protection of local jobs and other guarantees in exchange for supporting a merger between carmakers Renault and Fiat Chrysler, its finance minister said on Tuesday, underscoring the challenges facing the plan. Separately, Renault Chairman Jean-Dominique Senard arrived in Japan to discuss the proposed tie-up with the French company's existing partner Nissan — another potential obstacle to the $35 billion-plus merger of equals. Renault and Italian-American rival Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) are in talks to tackle the costs of far-reaching technological and regulatory changes by creating the world's third-biggest automaker. Shares in both companies jumped on Monday on news of a deal that would create an industry No.3 behind Japan's Toyota and Germany's Volkswagen and target 5 billion euros ($5.6 billion) a year in savings. Renault shares were up 1.3 percent by 1030 GMT, extending gains from Monday when the stock had closed up 12 percent. Fiat shares were flat in Milan but the U.S. listed stock was indicated 8 percent higher after a public holiday on Monday. Analysts caution the companies face a challenge to win over powerful stakeholders ranging from the French and Italian governments, to trade unions and Nissan. French finance minister Bruno Le Maire told RTL radio on Tuesday the plan was a good opportunity for both Renault and the European car industry, which has been struggling for years with over-capacity and subdued demand. But he added the French government would seek four guarantees in exchange for backing a deal that would see its 15% stake in Renault reduced to 7.5% of the combined entity.

France's conditions

"The first: industrial jobs and industrial sites. I told the Renault chairman very clearly that it was the first of the guarantees I wanted from him in the opening of these negotiations. A guarantee on the preservation of industrial jobs and sites in France," said Le Maire. The minister also said France wanted to be well represented on the board of the new company, for it to be a leader in developing electric batteries, and for the deal to take place "within the framework of the alliance between Renault and Nissan." A source familiar with the matter told Reuters on Monday that Renault and FCA had given commitments about maintaining industrial jobs and sites, leaving room for white-collar and engineering layoffs as well as some plant downsizing. Also on Monday, Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini said Rome might need to take a stake in the combined company, balancing France's shareholding. Le Maire said he had spoken to the Japanese personally about the proposed tie-up. Asked how they had responded, he replied: "I look at the reaction of Nissan president Mr Saikawa, and it's a reaction that is open." Analysts have said Nissan, which is 43% owned by Renault and has a 15% non-voting stake in the French firm, might be reluctant to back an FCA-Renault tie-up that would probably use its technology less than the current Renault-Nissan alliance. However, Nissan CEO Hiroto Saikawa told Japanese TV on Tuesday that "strengthening the alliance and constructive discussions are forward looking, and we are open to constructive discussions." The Renault-Nissan alliance has been under strain since the arrest and ouster of its former chairman Carlos Ghosn late last year on charges of financial misconduct, with Nissan recently rebuffing a merger proposal from its partner.