Honda Skyroom Concept May Be Tiny, But It's Loaded With Tech

Honda Skyroom Concept May Be Tiny, But It's Loaded With Tech

There's little doubt that cars of the future will be powered by electricity and drive themselves. Sure, it looks as they will arrive a bit later than some had anticipated, but they are definitely coming, with practically all manufacturers investing heavily on these new technologies.

2020 Subaru Legacy First Drive | What's New, Safety Features, Starlink Tech

2020 Subaru Legacy First Drive | What's new, safety features, Starlink tech

OJAI, Calif. — No brand has benefited more from the crossover boom than Subaru. Subaru's spectacular rise – from fewer than 100,000 sales in 1995, to a record pace of roughly 700,000 this year – was fueled largely by all-wheel-drive crossovers like the Outback and Forester, as the American market basically fell into Subaru's lap. But unlike some competitors, Subaru is keeping full faith in sedans, as evidenced by the all-new 2020 Legacy. Its impressive redesign underlines the advantages of the humble family sedan, from a more-affordable price to superior fuel economy. In true Subaru fashion, or perhaps anti-fashion, the Legacy's self-effacing styling  that's hard to distinguish from its predecessor won't blow anyone away. But look past the workaday sheetmetal, and you'll find a decisively improved sedan. It's roomier than any class rival save the Accord, notably quiet and lavishly appointed, too. Consider the standard Eyesight suite of accident avoidance tech and a driver-monitoring system that's still AWOL on most luxury cars, including Teslas. And the 2020 Legacy is a solid value, at $23,645 to start. That undercuts the most-affordable Accord by nearly $1,000, and the Camry by $1,120 – and that's despite the Legacy's standard, full-time all-wheel drive, which has few peers in this segment. The 2020 Nissan Altima S AWD starts well north of the base Legacy, at $26,345, and although it's slightly more powerful than the Subaru, it's not enough to justify the premium. So if you buy a Legacy, it's like getting AWD for free, if you'd care to look at it that way. (Subaru certainly would).

Japan Monitoring High-tech Exports

Japan monitoring high-tech exports

Japan's government has been closely monitoring exports of its advanced technologies and expertise since April. That's when the Trade and Industry Ministry set up a special section.

The government doesn't want the country's expertise in fields such as artificial intelligence and biotechnology used in military applications after it's been exported.