Japan Boosts Virus Testing Capabilities

Japan boosts virus testing capabilities

Japan is expected to become capable of testing up to about 3,800 people a day for the coronavirus on Tuesday, as it is working to boost its testing capabilities.

The health ministry told municipalities across Japan to expand the scope of their screenings to include people with suspected infections who have had no travel history to the Chinese provinces of Hubei or Zhejiang.

Canon Eos R Mark Ii Reportedly Already In Testing

Canon EOS R Mark II Reportedly Already In Testing

Canon’s EOS R mirrorless camera was originally launched back in 2018. If you weren’t too thrilled by its specs or were waiting for a successor, you might be pleased to learn that we might be able to expect the Mark II version in 2020. This is according to a report from Canon Rumors who heard from their sources that testing of the EOS R Mark II is already underway.

The report goes on to claim that the camera will most likely be announced ahead of Photokina 2020 in May. Canon is also expected to announce more than one camera, where one model will the EOS R Mark II and the other will be the EOS Rs, which last we heard could be sporting support for dual memory cards.

Toyota Testing Solar Prius In Quest For Car You'll Never Need To Plug In

Toyota testing solar Prius in quest for car you'll never need to plug in

TOKYO — Inspired by new ultra-thin solar panels developed for satellites, a project led by Toyota is experimenting with a sun-powered Prius that it hopes will one day require no plugging in. In the Japanese government-funded demonstration project, Toyota engineers fitted solar panels designed by Sharp Corp to the hood, roof, rear window and spoiler to see how much juice the sun can generate. The electricity from the panels goes directly to the drive battery, so the Prius can charge while moving or when parked. On a good day, the charge can be sufficient for up to 35 miles of travel, more than the 29 miles driven a day by the average American, according to a study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. But the performance drops off quickly if it is cloudy or even when it's too hot out. If used in real-world driving in those conditions, the Prius would have to be plugged in to recharge. Toyota has experimented with solar panels on the Prius for years, but these new solar cells are super-slim — just 0.03 millimeters — making them malleable enough to form-fit to the body of a car. The engineers needed to create a buffer between the car and the cells to protect them, so the actual solar panel modules are closer to a centimeter thick. The trunk of the car is filled with batteries for the solar panels, adding extra weight of around 180 pounds. Making the entire package lighter and bringing down the extremely high costs are among the biggest challenges for the technology, said Satoshi Shizuka, Toyota's lead engineer on the project, adding that commercialization likely remained "years away".

Testing Stores Without Cash Registers

Testing stores without cash registers

Japan will raise its consumption tax to 10 percent from 8 percent in October, though some items will be unaffected by the change. This is causing problems for some smaller retailers who will have to juggle with dual tax rates at the cash register. Technology company NTT Data has a possible remedy for this headache: ditch the cash register entirely.

NTT Data opened an experimental store to test the system in Tokyo.

Next-gen Acura Tlx Spied Testing In Heavy Camouflage

Next-gen Acura TLX spied testing in heavy camouflage

We're sure you all remember that stunning Acura Type S Concept from yesterday. Acura said it's meant to influence the next-gen TLX's design, and lo and behold, here is the next-gen TLX. Of course, Acura has no intentions of letting us see the production car anytime soon, so we're treated to a heavily cladded prototype in the photos here. Looking at it in profile, the camouflaged car looks a whole lot like the Type S Concept we saw yesterday. The short rear overhang is similar, but the front of the production car looks like it hangs out over the front wheels a little further – it still shares the concept's overall long-hood/short-deck proportions, though. The roof tapers down into the decklid at a shallow angle, similar to the concept car. We're sad to see the same quad exhaust isn't protruding from the rear bumper of this tester. Instead, it gets a dual exhaust with wide, rectangular outlets on both sides. We think the car we're looking at here is likely a regular TLX, and not the spicy Type S variant most likely seen last year. There's one interior photo our shooter was able to snag, showing a similar infotainment screen as that used in the new RDX, something we fully expect for the production car. That touchpad system is far superior to Acura infotainment systems of the past, but it still isn't perfect. An analog tachometer is visible off to the left, indicating that the regular TLX trims probably won't introduce a fully digital instrument cluster. Not that we'd expect that; even the new RDX maintains analog gauges in its top spec. However the TLX story plays out, it won't hurt if the production car looks just like the well-received Type S Concept. It's unclear how long we'll have to wait to see the car in full, but we'll keep you posted.

Toyota Testing An Electric Car With A Solar Roof That Can Charge Itself

Toyota Testing An Electric Car With A Solar Roof That Can Charge Itself

The problem with electric cars is that they usually take a while to charge. Even fast charging still cannot compare to the speed it takes to refill a car with gas. We imagine that eventually there could be a point in time when we get used to charging times or when charging times drop, but until then, it seems that Toyota is exploring a new electric car concept.

As you can see in the photo above, Toyota is experimenting with a new electric car concept that comes with solar panels built into the roof, bonnet, and boot of the car. What this means is that as the car drives, the solar panels will be capable of drawing power from the sun, which in turn keeps the car’s battery charged.