2020 Toyota Avalon Trd First Drive Review | Grandpa's Got A Hot Date

2020 Toyota Avalon TRD First Drive Review | Grandpa's got a hot date

DALLAS, Tex. — How badly does Toyota want to remake its image as a purveyor of reliable but boring vehicles? Very badly indeed, it would appear. We've seen the fruits of the company's effort with the return of the Supra sports car, but we've also seen it in unexpected ways, perhaps none more so than the arrival of the 2020 Avalon TRD. With an average age in the mid-60s, the Avalon has the oldest owner body of any model in the Toyota lineup. Yet Toyota has sent its full-size sedan in for a TRD makeover, and the result is  curious but also endearing. Grandpa's got a brand-new bag. TRD (Toyota Racing Development) is the brand's tuner arm, and its ministrations to the Avalon largely mirror those of the only-slightly less-surprising Camry TRD, which debuted alongside its bigger brother. As with the Camry TRD, the chassis has received the bulk of the attention, with the aim of improving the big sedan's handling. Perhaps owing to its senior status (or status with seniors), the work is not quite as extensive here as it was with the Camry. But you'll notice it on the outside, where the Avalon TRD builds off the XSE trim level, adding a larger front splitter below the gloss-black mesh grille, lower body skirts in black with red striping, black window trim and outside mirrors, a rear diffuser, and a larger rear spoiler (although not the Camry TRD's rear wing). There are TRD-specific 19-inch wheels, also in black, and the brake calipers are painted red. Exterior colors are limited to red, black, silver, and pearl white. You'll notice it, too, on the inside, where the TRD's seats are upholstered in perforated SofTex (Toyota's manmade-leather material), with microsuede inserts, and feature red accents and "TRD" stitched into the headrests. There's more red stitching on the dash pad, the door armrests, the steering wheel, and the shift boot. The floor mats are edged in red, and the pedals get metal trim. As in the XSE, textured metal trim is used on place of wood on the dash and door panels, but there's grained hard plastic on the console that is somewhat disappointing. Functionally, there's nothing to criticize here, and the 9-inch infotainment screen that sits atop the center stack includes hard buttons to quickly jump between major functions. Unlike the Camry TRD, the Avalon gets a sunroof. From behind the wheel, you'll notice the TRD changes most off all on a tight autocross course. We drove a TRD back-to-back with a regular Avalon, and the difference between the two was marked. Wheeling the regular Avalon through the cones felt like piloting a Ford LTD in a 1970s cop show. Crank the wheel in the standard Avalon, and you wait, wait, wait for the car to come screeching around the corner, heeled over on its outside front tire. The Avalon TRD, by contrast, still feels like a big car, but it's a big car that responds. Turn-in is much more energetic, understeer is under control, and transitions are far tidier. Note that this comparison was against an Avalon Touring, with its adaptive dampers in Sport+ mode. The Avalon TRD, however, does without that technology. Instead, the Avalon TRD uses non-adaptive dampers with firmer tuning and internal rebound springs. The TRD sits 0.6 inch lower on stiffer springs, and its anti-roll bars are stiffer than those of the standard model. The TRD also adds Toyota's Active Cornering Assist, which can brake an inside wheel under power in curves to reduce understeer and tighten the car's line. Additionally, the front brake hardware has been beefed up with larger rotors and two-piston calipers. The Avalon also has more robust underbody braces (three of them) as on the Camry TRD, but it does not get that car's V-brace behind the rear seatback. Nor does it get the Camry TRD's stickier summer tires, instead retaining the all-season Michelin Primacy MXV4s used by the Avalon Touring model. The Avalon's TRD-specific 19" wheels are 4.5 pounds lighter, however. The TRD is powered by the same naturally aspirated V6 found in other Avalon models, and it is unchanged for TRD duty. Displacing 3.5 liters, it spins out 301 horsepower and 267 lb-ft of torque, distilled to the front wheels through a smooth-shifting and responsive 8-speed automatic with paddle shifters. In a sedan weighing well under 4,000 pounds, that's enough for robust acceleration, but not so much as to induce annoying torque steer. Even with a mashed accelerator, this Avalon goes where it's pointed. What is different with the powertrain here is the TRD-specific cat-back exhaust system. Although it doesn't alter the output totals, it does contribute to a satisfying, tearing-paper engine sound as the tach needle climbs past 4,000 rpm or so. The downside of the more free-flowing exhaust system is some droning resonance around 60 mph, but it's really not enough to disrupt the Avalon's still-placid highway demeanor. Nor is that demeanor totally upended by the firmer suspension. The Avalon TRD feels pleasantly tied down but not terribly harsh — at least that was the impression on the fairly smooth roads where we drove the Avalon in north Texas. Beat-up boulevards in the Northeast or Midwest might reveal something more. Priced at $43,255 (with destination), the TRD sits near the top of the 2020 Avalon lineup, just $200 below the Touring and $5,000 above the XSE. Toyota says production is limited to fewer than 2,600. That's not a huge number, but it should be enough to raise a few eyebrows and help raise the profile of this once-sleepy sedan.

2020 Toyota Camry Trd First Drive Review | Driving Impressions, Specs, Photos

2020 Toyota Camry TRD First Drive Review | Driving impressions, specs, photos

DALLAS, Tex. — Autocrossing a Toyota Camry shouldn't be fun … should it? Everyone knows a Camry is best enjoyed from the rear seat, while your Uber driver chauffeurs you home after a night at the bar. Or at least, that has historically been the case. But Toyota's mainstay sedan has evolved into a car that also can be appreciated from behind the wheel, and buyers appear to be taking notice. Since the latest-generation Camry debuted for 2018, the SE and XSE models combined have accounted for some 60% of the model mix, according to Toyota. But the 2020 Toyota Camry TRD moves beyond those models, taking the Camry to a place it has never credibly gone before: a coned autocross course. The brand's in-house tuner arm, TRD (Toyota Racing Development), has to date mostly expended its energies making trucks and SUVs more off-road ready. TRD-branded models include the 4Runner, Tacoma, Tundra, and Sequoia. In creating the 2020 Camry TRD, the first TRD-branded sedan, the primary objective was to improve handling. Of course, the car also has to look the part. There's the rear wing — a Camry first — but also side aero skirts in black with red striping, extended front splitters, and a diffuser under the rear bumper. A gloss-black grille, special matte-black wheels, and a black roof complete the look. Exterior colors are limited to black, red, pearl white, and silver. Sorry, no beige. Inside, drivers are treated to red accents before they get the red mist. The TRD Camry's black interior sees red stripes on the seats and a red "TRD" stitched into the headrests. There also are red seatbelts; red edging on the floor mats; and red contrast stitching on the dash, steering wheel, gear lever, and shift boot. The gauge numbers also are red. The Camry is one of the final holdouts still offering a V6 engine in a class that has increasingly downsized and added turbocharging, and that engine is unchanged for TRD duty, making the same 301 horsepower and 267 lb-ft of torque as it does in the XSE and XLE models. It does, however, get a revised cat-back exhaust system to trumpet more engine sound. A stiffer structure always benefits handling, and the TRD folks have added a V-brace behind the Camry's rear seatback (sacrificing its fold-down function). Additionally, three under-car braces have been beefed up. The revised suspension features firmer coil springs and dampers and beefier anti-roll bars, all employed in a quest for increased roll stiffness. The dampers also gain internal rebound springs, and there are new jounce bumpers to preserve some semblance of ride quality. The new setup lowers the ride height by 0.6 inch, which pays ancillary benefits in the visual department. Toyota's Active Cornering Assist, which can brake an inside wheel in turns, is employed here and is exclusive to the TRD. The Camry TRD dons a set of athletic footwear in the form of model-specific 19 x 8.5" alloy wheels that are half-an-inch wider and 3.1 pounds lighter than the 19" units on the XSE. For maximum stick, they're wrapped with Bridgestone Potenza summer tires, size 235/40. Peeking through the matte-black wheels are snappy, red-painted brake calipers. The fronts have been upgraded to two-piston units (the rears are unchanged), and they squeeze 0.9-inch-larger rotors. We drove the TRD back-to-back with the next-sportiest Camry variant, the V6 XSE. In a tight coned course, the TRD exhibited far more grip, body control, and eagerness to turn in. Where the XSE just wanted to push, the TRD was less prone to understeer and ultimately felt more balanced. It also stayed more planted in quick transitions and was much more resistant to body roll. The car actually was fun to toss around. We also made time to drive the Camry TRD on the street, where the difference versus the XSE model was less transformative but still evident. The TRD car has retuned electric power steering, and that combined with the different (although same-size) tires makes for improved steering feel, with the helm noticeably more precise on center. It's best appreciated in Sport mode, which reduces steering assist compared to Normal mode. Cruising through a couple of fast sweepers, this Camry feels athletic, and isn't terribly upset by bumps. The roads north of Dallas were generally pretty smooth, but crossing a set a railroad tracks we did feel some impact harshness, and we suspect that over broken pavement the TRD's firmer suspension will exact a toll in ride quality. As noted, TRD left the Camry's powertrain alone except for the exhaust system, but this V6 makes about as much as you'd want to send through the front wheels anyway. The Camry steps lively off the line, but with peak torque arriving at 4,700 rpm, the engine unsurprisingly provides its most muscular response as the tach needle swings toward 5k. With the revised exhaust, this vociferous V6 sounds better than any 2.0-liter turbo four at higher revs. But there is also a bit of not-so-welcome resonance when cruising at a steady 50 to 60 mph, although it's pretty faint, taking a back seat to the noise from the Bridgestones. In all other ways, this is a Camry, which means it has a roomy interior, comfortable front seats, and good outward visibility. It has the same funhouse dashboard with its slashing curves, agreeable mechanical shifter, and fairly simple infotainment system as its siblings. The TRD-specific Softex fabric does a reasonable approximation of leather, and the red elements are sporty without being cheesy – but the red instrument markings are hard to see when wearing sunglasses. With a starting price of $31,995 (with destination), the TRD is the lowest-priced Camry with a V6 engine. It comes in $3,410 below the V6 XLE and $3,960 less than the V6 XSE. That may seem surprising, but the TRD's equipment level is more akin to the four-cylinder SE model. Thus, the TRD skips the sunroof, leather, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and larger touchscreen with navigation that are all standard on the XSE and XLE V6 models. Among the included features are adaptive cruise control with automatic emergency braking, lane-departure warning, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and a 7-inch touchscreen infotainment system with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. Toyota says that production of the 2020 Camry TRD is limited but seems not to have settled on an exact number. We're told that fewer than 6,000 will be built. It would be a shame if at least a few of them don't find their way to an autocross.

2020 Toyota Tacoma Trd Pro Pricing Information Released

2020 Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro pricing information released

The Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro was developed to climb mountains, but it also learned how to climb up in the Japanese firm's pricing chart. Buyers who take home the 2020 variant of the truck will pay considerably more than those who signed the dotted line on a 2019 model.   For the next model year, the Tacoma TRD Pro carries a base price of $45,080 after a mandatory $1,120 destination charge. Cars Direct points out that figure represents an increase of precisely $1,000 over the outgoing 2019 model. It corresponds to a truck with a six-speed stick, too. Factor in the optional automatic transmission, and the bill comes to $47,785.   If the thought of paying nearly $50,000 for a Tacoma makes your head spin, keep in mind most of its rivals are priced in the same ballpark. The Jeep Gladiator Rubicon costs $47,040 when equipped with an automatic transmission, for example. And, for 2020, the trail-wise TRD Pro variant benefits from lighter wheels, redesigned Fox shocks, and a panoramic view monitor that gives drivers a 360-degree view of what's around them. One camera even shows what's under the truck.   Pricing for the rest of the Tacoma range stays relatively flat in spite of updates all across the board. Most variants are approximately $200 more expensive in 2020 and than in 2019, and they receive a new-look front end and grille, and a new infotainment system compatible with Android Auto, Apple CarPlay and Amazon Alexa. That's huge news for buyers seeking connectivity; Toyota doggedly resisted Android Auto and Apple CarPlay for years.   The 2020 Toyota Tacoma will reach showrooms across the United States in the coming weeks. It will join updated versions of the 4Runner and the Tundra, which are also more expensive for 2020.

2020 Toyota Camry Trd Pricing Leaked According To Report

2020 Toyota Camry TRD pricing leaked according to report

The 2020 Toyota Camry TRD takes a different approach to its place in lineup than the 2020 Toyota Avalon TRD.  Cars Direct, having seen order guides for the Camry TRD, says the sedan will start at $31,955 after a $955 charge for destination. That makes it about $2,000 more than the most expensive four-cylinder Camry trim, and $3,410 less than the least expensive six-cylinder Camry, the $35,405 XLE V6. The Camry TRD has just become the most cost-effective way to get the 93 additional horsepower that comes with the 3.5-liter V6. Compare that to the Avalon strategy. The Avalon TRD came in at $43,255, which is $4,000 more than the sport-inclined Avalon XSE with the same 3.5-liter V6 engine, and not even $1,000 from the most expensive Limited Hybrid trim. When Cars Direct asked Toyota about the positioning, the carmaker responded that the Carmry TRD should be judged against the mid-grade, four-cylinder SE trim that sits two levels below the four-cylinder XSE trim, and costs $5,000 less than the V6 Camry TRD. Since the TRD version gets performance and appearance mods like a tuned, lowered suspension, larger brakes, a TRD exhaust, black wheels, aero tweaks, and interior eye candy, the standard equipment list stays modest. The TRD sticks with SofTex synthetic leather seating and can't be optioned with the Navigation or the Driver Assist Packages. If the TRD trim mirrors the SE package options across the board, a moonroof, a blind spot monitor and keyless entry, and an Entune 3.0 audio system that bundles dual-zone climate control will be the only possible upgrades.  Cars Direct didn't break out pricing for all Camry trims, but price increases are coming based on order guide figures for the SE, XLE V6 and XSE V6. The SE goes up by $200 to $26,995, the XLE V6 will cost $150 more, and the top-tier XSE increases by $110.

2020 Toyota Avalon Trd Priced At $43,255

2020 Toyota Avalon TRD priced at $43,255

Last November, Toyota pulled back the covers on the 2020 Avalon TRD and 2020 Camry TRD, and we've been waiting on pricing ever since. Half of our question has been answered now that Cars Direct spied an order guide for the Avalon TRD. MSRP for the bigger sedan comes in at $42,300, plus a destination charge of $955, totaling $43,255. That copies the formula for Toyota truck pricing, where all but one TRD versions slot underneath the top trim. The Avalon TRD's cost puts it $200 above the Limited model and $200 below the Touring trim. If that seems like fuzzy math, it's because as of writing, Toyota hasn't updated its U.S. site with 2020 Avalon prices. The new MSRPs and their changes compared to 2019 are:

  • XLE FWD, $36,755 ($150 more than in 2019)
  • XLE Hybrid FWD, $37,805 ($200 more)
  • XSE FWD, $39,255 ($150 more)
  • XSE Hybrid FWD, $40,305 ($200 more)
  • Limited FWD, $43,055 ($150 more)
  • TRD FWD $43,255
  • Touring FWD, $43,455 ($150 more)
  • Limited Hybrid FWD, $44,105 ($200 more)
For that money, the Avalon TRD is like sliding Joe Gibbs Racing NASCAR coveralls over a pair of Dockers and a blue Oxford button-down. Powered by a 3.5-liter V6 with 301 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque, the TRD trim can do more with the available power compared to the XSE trim that shares the same motor. The TRD benefits from thicker unibody bracing for a stiffer shell, exclusive dampers, springs that lower the car by 0.6 inches, and larger 12.9-inch front rotors with twin-piston calipers. New bodywork includes an unforgettable front fascia, sharper side skirts, a decklid spoiler, rear diffuser, and 19-inch matte black wheels that shed 18 pounds compared to the stock XSE wheels. Tinted taillights further highlight the look, the cat-back exhaust highlights the sound. Inside, front seat passengers sit in Sport SofTex seats with red accents, embroidered headrests, and red seat belts. The leather-wrapped steering wheel matches with red contrast stitching, and TRD-branded floor mats grace the footwells. 2020 Camry TRD pricing should be out soon, since both sedans are due at dealerships by the end of September.

Toyota Built An Avalon Trd Drift Car With A Handbrake

Toyota built an Avalon TRD drift car with a handbrake

The manual gear shifter isn't the only stick that's been disappearing from automobiles. With the market-wide adoption of the electronic parking brake, manual handbrakes have largely become part of history, as well. Toyota recently revived the handbrake, however, in an unexpected custom car built to drift – or, more accurately, slide.

Toyota team member and paralympic track and field athlete Jarryd Wallace wanted to create a surprise experience for his dad Jeff Wallace for Father's Day. Wallace settled on bringing pops to the track and sending him out for a hot lap with drifting specialist Ken Gushi. In an interesting twist, the chosen car was not a rear-wheel drive Supra or 86. Instead, it was a front-wheel drive Avalon TRD.