New High Beam Lamp Does Not Dazzle Other Drivers


New High Beam Lamp Does Not Dazzle Other DriversStanley Electric Co Ltd developed a high beam lamp that does not dazzle the drivers of vehicles running ahead or coming in the opposite direction.

The lamp, "Adaptive Driving Beam (ADB)," was demonstrated in the company's booth at Ceatec Japan 2014, which took place from Oct 7 to 11, 2014, in Chiba Prefecture, Japan.

It takes images of scenes ahead of the vehicle with a camera attached to, for example, the back of the rear-view mirror, detects the direction of a vehicle running ahead or coming in the opposite direction and turns off part of the high beam emitted in the direction. As a result, it becomes possible to avoid dazzling other drivers while emitting light to a distance and ensuring a clear view at night.

The light source of the ADB uses 12 LED chips, which consist of four blocks. By turning on/off each block, it becomes possible to block part of the light directed at other vehicles. With right and left high beam lamps, there are eight emission patterns.

The lamps are slowly turned on/off so that the driver of the vehicle does not feel odd. And the speed of turning on/off the lamps slightly changes in accordance with the speed of the vehicle.

"Although the hardware was developed by combining existing technologies, it was difficult to adjust the control technology such as the function to slowly turn on and off the lamps," Stanley Electric said.

Some other manufacturers have already commercialized ADBs that block part of a high beam depending on the existence of a vehicle running ahead or coming in the opposite direction. But the ADB developed by Stanley Electric is controlled only by switching on/off LED chips and does not use a mechanical structure. The company will consider applying the ADB in consultation with finished car manufacturers, etc.