Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross Small Crossover Is An Iihs Top Safety Pick - Autoblog

Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross small crossover is an IIHS Top Safety Pick - Autoblog

The 2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross is a funky little crossover with a name that has angered more than a few Eclipse fans out there. Today it gets honors from the IIHS, though, in the form of a Top Safety Pick award. It's great to see the totally new Mitsubishi get safety honors for what is probably the best car the company sells in the U.S. now. You will have to get an upmarket version of the vehicle for it to be one that qualifies for the award, though. That nets you the LED headlights rated as Acceptable and the front crash prevention technology. It avoided collisions when traveling at 12 mph and 25 mph in IIHS testing. On top of that, it needed to score Good in all the major crashworthiness tests, which it did. The full breakout of scores showed it scored an Acceptable rating for some of the specifics the IIHS was looking into, but the car appears plenty safe from a crash perspective. Child safety seat testing found that the car's LATCH system was extremely easy to use, netting it a Good rating in that category, too. The 2019 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross starts at $24,690 for a completely base car, and stretches to around the $30,000 mark in its most expensive form.

Watch The 2020 Toyota Supra Get Some Air On A Track - Autoblog

Watch the 2020 Toyota Supra get some air on a track - Autoblog

As if the Supra needed any help garnering more attention: After first announcing the return of the historic sports car at the Super Bowl earlier this year, Toyota is launching a new advertising campaign for the 2020 GR Supra called "This Is Our Sport." Part of the multi-video offensive includes a clip that shows the Supra carving up a track and getting some air beneath its tires. On the 50th anniversary of NASA launching Apollo 11 to the moon, Toyota has released video of the Supra launching inches above the pavement. Sure, it's not quite as momentous, but it's pretty sweet any time we see footage of a performance vehicle running at 11/10ths. And the drifts. LOTS of drifts. Not surprising, considering it makes more horsepower than advertised.  Officially, the 30-second video is called "Track Day," and it's the longest of the pack of advertisements. Others include six-second spots called "Joy" and "Face Off," which shows the old Supra meeting the new Supra in a design comparison of sorts.  "Track Day" will appropriately air during motorsports events, but that's not the end of the story. Toyota will also be releasing a long-form video called "Game of Horsepower," which will use the Supra in a game of H.O.R.S.E. and will debut across the company's social media channels. Check out "Track Day" above.

2020 Subaru Legacy And Outback Pricing Announced - Autoblog

2020 Subaru Legacy and Outback pricing announced - Autoblog

Pricing for the 2020 Subaru Legacy sedan and Outback crossover are now available. Both models were completely redesigned for the model year, but base prices have barely gone up. The 2020 Subaru Legacy starts at $23,645, just $215 more than the old model. The 2020 Subaru Outback now starts at $27,655, which is $335 more than the 2019 Outback. Price differences vary depending on trims, but for the 2.5-liter 4-cylinder models, the prices have only gone up a few hundred dollars. You can see the breakdown of Legacy prices below, and the Outback prices below the next paragraph. As for the turbocharged models, the price increase is quite a bit more compared with equivalent 3.6R 6-cylinder examples from 2019. The cheapest turbocharged Legacy is $35,095, which is $2,665 more than its flat-six predecessor. With the Outback, you can technically get a turbo model for less than the cheapest 2019 six-cylinder model. It starts at $35,905, whereas the entry-level 6-cylinder Outback for 2019 started at $35,970. But keeping trims matched up, the same trim turbo model is $38,755, an increase of $2,785. Regardless of Legacy or Outback trim, buyers will get more power and torque. The base 2.5-liter inline-4 makes 182 horsepower and 176 pound-feet of torque, up from 175 and 174, respectively. The turbo engine makes 260 horsepower versus 256 from the old 6-cylinder, and 277 pound-feet of torque instead of 247. Both vehicles are completely redesigned boasting lighter, stiffer chassis and a much nicer interior with a massive center touchscreen available. Be sure to check out our first look articles on the Outback and Legacy for additional details on the new cars.

New Nissan Skyline Breaks Cover In Japan, Hints Of Gt-r In The Styling - Autoblog

New Nissan Skyline breaks cover in Japan, hints of GT-R in the styling - Autoblog

The current Infiniti Q50, known in Japan as the Nissan Skyline, doesn't evoke images of the 2020 GT-R in our minds. But Nissan is aiming to change that ever so slightly with the newest version of its Skyline. The inspiration is clear both the front and rear. Nissan performed a full overhaul on the front end to give it a fascia similar to that of the GT-R. The proportions are not exactly the same, but the shape is obvious. Nissan says it's also bringing back the four-circle taillights we're so used to seeing on older Skylines. It's not an exact replica of the past, but we can definitely see what Nissan is going for. Engine options are sort of a moot point, since we're sure an updated Q50 will differ from the Nissan version of the car. Still, Japan does get the equivalent to what we call the 400 Red Sport with a 3.0-liter twin-turbo V6 making 400 horsepower. It's called the 400R in Japan. There are a couple hybrid options available, too. Nissan took this Skyline debut as an opportunity to show off the second generation of its ProPilot Assist, called ProPilot 2.0. There's no word as to when this more advanced system will make it into U.S. cars, but it's going to be on the new Skyline. The big news here is legitimate hands-off highway driving when cruising in a single lane. Nissan takes a page out of Cadillac's book to accomplish such a feat, using a driver monitoring system in the cabin to continually confirm the driver's attention is on the road. In order for the system to work, the driver will need to have a destination set in the car's navigation system. The car will attempt to judge when it should pass a slower moving vehicle, based on the navigation system and all the car's sensors. Once decided, the driver will receive audio and visual guidance to put their hands on the wheel, then will need to confirm the pass with a switch. The car will apparently take it from there, so long as your hands are detected on the wheel. Nissan says that if a driver fails to respond to an alert, the vehicle automatically puts the flashers on and slowly comes to a stop. Regular ProPilot Assist hasn't even been rolled out to every new Nissan in the U.S., but we hope to be able to test this system as soon as it's available in cars stateside. Nissan bills it as an "on-ramp to off-ramp," which makes it's one of the more comprehensive driver assistance systems out there.