Honda E Gets Final Range And Power Numbers Ahead Of Frankfurt

Honda E gets final range and power numbers ahead of Frankfurt

We've been waiting a long time for this. Official Honda E production details are out, including range, power, acceleration and new photos. Honda claims the little hatchback will be capable of going 136.7 miles on a full charge. That number isn't exactly competitive with anything more than the low-range Nissan Leaf and BMW i3 sold in America, but total range isn't the point with this car. Honda has already said that it's prioritizing a low weight and smaller form factor for city usage. We'll note one caveat with the range figure. Honda says the number comes from internal estimates, and doesn't indicate if it's 136.7 miles on the WLTP or NEDC standards. There will be two power outputs available. The base electric motor produces 134 horsepower, while the upgraded E will make 152 horsepower. Both versions put out 232 pound-feet of torque. Acceleration to 62 mph will take approximately 8 seconds, according to Honda. Finally, the Honda E is capable of fast charging, going from 0-80 percent capacity in as little as 30 minutes. It's a small 35.5 kWh battery pack, but Honda still hasn't provided a final, official curb weight. The last important bit of news revealed today is that these photos are the first showing a Honda E in its final production form. Up until now, all the Honda E photos have been of concepts or pre-production vehicles. That said, good luck finding anything different between these photos and the last big batch of pictures Honda released. The car is still as cute and stylish as ever — you'll be able to see it in person at the Frankfurt Motor Show later this month. We could totally go for one as a city/commuter car, especially with the ludicrous 14-foot turning radius Honda promises. This may be the sixth, seventh or maybe even 20th time we've said it, but we sure do want the Honda E in America, too.

New Updates Add August 2019 Security Patches To A Range Of Xperia Phones

New updates add August 2019 security patches to a range of Xperia phones

Sony Mobile has recently been rolling out a number of firmware updates to its smartphone portfolio, adding August 2019 Android security patches in the process. Sony has released new firmware to a number of handsets including the latest Xperia 1 flagship (55.0.A.6.16), and Xperia 10 mid-rangers (53.0.A.8.71).

Iwaya: N.korea Fired Short-range Ballistic Missiles

Iwaya: N.Korea fired short-range ballistic missiles

The Japanese government says it has determined that two projectiles fired by North Korea last week were short-range ballistic missiles.

On Monday, Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya told reporters that the government had concluded the projectiles were short-range ballistic missiles, based on information it had collected.

Nikon Could Have A Mid-range Mirrorless Camera In The Works For $900

Nikon Could Have A Mid-Range Mirrorless Camera In The Works For $900

With the launch of the new Nikon Z-series of full-frame mirrorless cameras, it saw the company change up its strategy and approach to mirrorless cameras. Unlike the company’s previous attempts, the new Z-series seems to be much more well-received. Unfortunately, they do not come cheap, making it a bit inaccessible for those who aren’t necessarily professionals.

However, there is some good news because according to a report from Nikkei, it seems that Nikon could actually have a new mirrorless camera in the works. This model is said to be a mid-range model that could cost $900, making it more affordable than what the company has to offer at the moment.

New Updates Add May 2019 Security Patches To A Range Of Xperia Phones

New updates add May 2019 security patches to a range of Xperia phones

Sony Mobile has been on a roll recently, updating many of its Xperia smartphones to add the May 2019 Android security patches. You can see the full list below of Xperia phones that have been updated, which includes the XZ1, XA2 and XA1 ranges. However, even the Xperia L1, L2 and L3 were all updated to the same patches which was good to see.

Sony Made An Iot Chip That Has A Range Of 60 Miles

Sony Made An IoT Chip That Has A Range Of 60 Miles

However, it seems that Sony has quietly developed an IoT chip that has a range of 60 miles. According to Sony, “Most IoT systems wirelessly transfer information obtained by various sensors to cloud servers, where the data is collected and processed, and the output then sent to user devices such as smartphones or tablets for display.”

This means that instead of relying on WiFi that might have a limited range or using a cellular connection, the range of 60 miles would allow IoT devices to communicate with each other and the network faster and over a greater range. According to Sony, they cite examples of its use, such as tracking your friends on a ski hill, tracking wildlife, locate ships, monitor races, and so on.

Mitsubishi Realigning Its Suv Range To Create More Size Difference

Mitsubishi realigning its SUV range to create more size difference

A report in Autocar says Mitsubishi wants more literal space between its three core SUVs. The outlet quotes "a senior source" saying, "Today we aren't in an ideal position, with our SUVs close in size, but in the next 18 months you will start to see a strategy that separates them out." Redesigns for the next generation of the Outlander, Eclipse Cross, and Outlander Sport will put about 200 millimeters' (7.9 inches) difference in length between each.

Right now, the Outlander stands 184.8 inches long, the Eclipse Cross 173.4 inches long, and the Outlander Sport is scarcely smaller at 171.9 inches long. Autocar says the revamp would see the Outlander grow, while the Outlander Sport gets smaller. Based on the comments, if the Outlander gets longer, then we wouldn't be surprised at seeing the Eclipse Cross putting on a few inches, too.

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus Second Drive Review | Riding The Extended Range

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus Second Drive Review | Riding the extended range

An electric vehicle has an appeal you can only understand once you've owned one. Sure, you might feel good about going green, analyzing every environmental consideration like our Alex Kierstein did recently. But there's a less noble, more immediately tangible reason to buy an EV — it really brings out one's inner cheapskate.

There is nothing sweeter than passing up the gas station where you used to throw away a $50 bill every week. Before purchasing a 2013 Nissan Leaf to serve my 35-mile daily commute, I had never imagined how satisfying it would be to whoosh past the pumps. Stuck in Seattle traffic, surrounded by gasoline-powered cars wastefully idling, my only energy loss was from the radio. There was political smugness: It felt kinda great to stick it to Big Oil. Don't have to stop, buy gas, fill up, change oil — don't have to do anything except remember to plug the car in at night.