Nissan Rogue Hybrid Is Out For 2020 Model Year - Autoblog

Nissan Rogue Hybrid is out for 2020 model year - Autoblog

The Nissan Rogue Hybrid is officially dead for the 2020 model year. Nissan sent out a press release early this morning with pricing for the 2020 Rogue, and we noticed the Hybrid model was curiously missing from the sheet. We dropped a line to Nissan to figure out what was going on. Here's the official word from Nissan spokesperson Kevin Raftery: "Nissan will not offer the Rogue Hybrid for model year 2020. We will continue to focus efforts on the best-selling Rogue and new 2020 Rogue Sport." Nissan's hybrid compact crossover was almost a unique idea when it came out for the 2017 model year. Toyota had the RAV4 Hybrid. A redesigned (much improved) version of that is out for 2019, and the new Escape is getting both a Hybrid and Plug-in Hybrid version. We called it "A can't-lose idea" in our First Drive story then, but history has proven our seeing-eye glass wrong. Raftery wouldn't say exact sales figures, but he did say that Rogue Hybrid was "a small part of the overall sales mix for Rogue." If you break it down by cost, the Rogue Hybrid was asking a lot without providing much in return. The base 2019 Rogue Hybrid is a whopping $2,800 more than a regular Rogue. You netted five mpg in the combined EPA rating, which the agency says would save you approximately $200 a year over a normal Rogue in fuel costs. Doing the math, you'd have to drive the car for 14 years before you break even on gas savings. That's a long time driving a Nissan Rogue. Another reason for its demise is the entrance of the new RAV4 Hybrid. The previous RAV4 Hybrid was actually less efficient than the Rogue Hybrid, though it was only beaten by one mpg in comparable all-wheel drive models. A 2019 RAV4 Hybrid gets seven mpg better than the Rogue Hybrid all-wheel drive now. That's a pretty easy decision for folks at the dealership comparing the two side-by-side. You'll still be able to buy the 2019 Rogue Hybrid for some time, but those will be disappearing from lots sooner rather than later. A base Rogue Hybrid SV starts at $28,595, and a fully-loaded SL trim comes in at $33,885. All other non-hybrid models received small price bumps of around $200 in each trim level for 2020.

2021 Nissan Rogue Spy Shots Give Us Our First Look At The Next-gen Crossover

2021 Nissan Rogue spy shots give us our first look at the next-gen crossover

Here's our first look at what we think is the next-gen Nissan Rogue, and it looks like Nissan is shaking it up this time. The swoopy and swept-back design on the current Rogue's front end is nowhere to be found, as it's replaced by a blocky, straight up and down look. If not for the semi-visible V-Motion grille seen through the wrappings, it would be rather difficult to I.D. this car.

Much of that is due to the rather generic crossover shape seen through the camouflage. The closest thing to a Rogue-like concept car we've seen from Nissan as of late is the Xmotion, and this doesn't exactly take much inspiration from the wild concept. That particular car is much more rugged in appearance, while this one remains a staid crossover, making sure it doesn't rock the boat. One specific design element we can pick out is a separate headlight/driving light setup. Similar to cars like the Hyundai Santa Fe or Chevrolet Blazer, the Rogue appears to be splitting up the DRL from the main headlight. The size of the gap between the two visible headlight fixtures is just too large for it all to be one massive headlight unit. With headlights getting smaller all the time, and this design trend starting to take off, it's no big surprise to see it here.

2019 Nissan Rogue Sport Review And Buying Guide | Stylish But Not Sporty

2019 Nissan Rogue Sport Review and Buying Guide | Stylish but not sporty

The Nissan Rogue Sport crossover is small, attractive, and relatively cheap. Despite sharing a name with the larger Rogue, the Rogue Sport is a completely different vehicle. It's the least expensive vehicle in Nissan's portfolio with optional all-wheel drive. What it doesn't offer, despite its name, is a sporty driving experience, and it can get surprisingly pricey if a buyer isn't careful with options.

What's new for 2019?

Nissan added its new Rear Door Alert technology, which activates the horn and other notifications when the system detects the rear door opened before the engine started but wasn't re-opened after shutting down. Also standard are a rearview monitor, a Bluetooth phone and infotainment system that features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, plus an available nine-speaker Bose audio system. There's a new color option and the expanded availability of its ProPilot Assist semi-autonomous driving and Safety Shield 360 safety technologies. And finally, there's a new exterior color, Scarlet Ember Tintcoat, added to the list of choices.

What's the interior and in-car technology like?

The Rogue Sport is a pretty nice place from which to watch the miles pass by. You probably wouldn't want to spend a lot of time in the rear seat, but it's roomier than a lot of the competition, and both front seats are cozy. The optional leather seats look and feel nicer than you'd expect for a vehicle in this class. The thick, flat-bottomed steering wheel feels good to hold, and helps add a little to the perception of sportiness.

2019 Nissan Rogue Sport Drivers' Notes Review | Comfortably In The Middle

2019 Nissan Rogue Sport Drivers' Notes Review | Comfortably in the middle

There isn't a whole lot that's new for the Nissan Rogue Sport for the 2019 model year (a light refresh is coming for 2020). But Nissan's two-pronged Rogue strategy (the automaker bundles both the subcompact Rogue Sport and compact Rogue into the same sales figure each month) continues to be popular with consumers. In fact, the dual-headed Rogue ranks as the fourth-best-selling nameplate in America so far in 2019, sitting behind nothing but the Big Three's full-size pickup trucks.

Three trim levels are available — S, SV, and SL. All Rogue Sports are powered by the same 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that sends 141 horsepower and 147 pound-feet of torque to either the front or optionally all four wheels through a continuously variable transmission.

Nissan Rogue Crossovers Investigated For Unexpected Braking

Nissan Rogue crossovers investigated for unexpected braking

WASHINGTON — The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is probing reports of unintended braking in 675,000 2017-2018 Nissan Rogue vehicles, it said on Friday. NHTSA said it is opening a defect petition review in response to a request by the Center for Auto Safety. The agency will look at reports of the vehicles' automatic emergency braking system engaging with no apparent obstruction in the vehicle's path. There are no reports of injuries or deaths associated with the petition. Nissan said it had investigated the issue extensively and after talks with NHTSA, as well as its Canadian counterpart, Transport Canada, it had notified all affected Rogue vehicle customers in the United States and Canada of a software update. "As always, Nissan will continue to work collaboratively with NHTSA and Transport Canada on all matters of product safety," Nissan said in a statement. Nissan faces a class-action lawsuit over unintended braking issues in U.S. District Court in California covering Nissan and Infiniti vehicles sold since 2015. The suit says a defect can trigger the brakes and cause vehicles "to abruptly slow down or come to a complete stop in the middle of traffic."

2019 Nissan Rogue Review And Buying Guide

2019 Nissan Rogue Review and Buying Guide

The 2019 Nissan Rogue compact crossover makes a wonderful first impression. Its attractive styling bucks the usual trend of frumpy and/or utilitarian design, and despite this model being around for five years since its last full redesign, it still looks pretty fresh. The interior similarly looks good, there's plenty of up-to-date tech, and those seeking lots of family-friendly space will find one of the roomiest cabins in the segment.

However, the longer you spend with the Rogue, you might start to notice the underpowered engine, unrefined transmission and general dreary driving experience. Back-to-back test drives of key competitors — most of which have been more recently redesigned — might also reveal that they manage to at least match the Rogue's strong points while substantially bettering it in others. Not a bad choice, but we think there are better ones.

2020 Nissan Rogue Sport Gets To Go Rogue With Its Own Look

2020 Nissan Rogue Sport gets to go rogue with its own look

Nissan has more in store for the Rogue Sport, after changes to the 2019 model added more standard and optional equipment. For 2020, the Rogue Sport gets its own design personality, instead of making do as a junior-sized Rogue. That means a new front fascia with a Vmotion grille that looks takes a distinct stand somewhere between the grilles on the Rogue and the Altima. Beside that, trim, elongated headlights get a fresh DRL pattern.

The whole shebang's topped off with a new hood, but nothing's changed underneath that hood. The 2020 Rogue Sport comes with the 141-horsepower, 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and Xtronic CVT transmission.