2019 Honda Civic Sport Sedan Review | Keep Up The Fun

2019 Honda Civic Sport Sedan Review | Keep up the fun

If the ninth-generation 2012 Civic was considered a sizeable step back, the tenth-generation 2016 Civic represented two giant steps forward for the nameplate and the entire lineup. The mildly facelifted 2019 Civic expands on that progress by introducing a Sport trim for the sedan that offers a six-speed manual transmission. But don't think of the long, lean four-door as a trunked version of the more expensive Sport hatchback with its more powerful turbocharged engine. The sedan, which Honda describes as "entry-level performance," aims at the hearts of budget-conscious and first-time buyers seeking sedan sobriety leavened by a touch of old-fashioned Honda fun.

Cosmetic changes across the lineup for 2019 introduce a gloss black grille, a wider, more sculpted lower bumper, and repositioned Honda Sensing gear to add symmetry to the lower front intakes. The Sport trim goes without the chrome accents around the front fog lights found on the other four trims — LX, EX, EX-L, and Touring. And unlike those other variants, the Sport sedan slots a trapezoidal exhaust finisher into a four-fin, diffuser-like insert. Inside, the instrument binnacle glows with red lighting, the pedals are made of aluminum, it has a leather-wrapped steering wheel, and it features the nicer infotainment system with a 7-inch screen (and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration).

Honda Extends Warranty For Cr-v And Civic Due To Engine Problems

Honda extends warranty for CR-V and Civic due to engine problems

If you recently bought a new or newer Honda CR-V or Civic, you're going to want to listen to this news. Honda is extending the powertrain warranty on more than 1 million cars in the U.S. Specifically, Honda is targeting 2017-2018 CR-Vs and 2016-2018 Civics with the 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine.

Consumer Reports uncovered a memo sent to Honda dealers concerning the news from Honda's manager of auto campaigns and recalls. That memo said that the oil in these engines could be diluted due to software settings or potential hardware failures. A previous report didn't name the Civic's version of the 1.5-liter turbo as a problem yet, but it looks like Honda's internal investigation has found it to suffer from a similar issue as the CR-V's "rising" oil levels.

Look At This Epic Honda Civic Type R Rally Car

Look at this epic Honda Civic Type R rally car

The Honda Civic Type R is an absolute joy to drive on-road, but this rally build looks mouthwateringly good from the limited photos available. Details are scant, but Honda reportedly collaborated with Ralph Hosier Engineering (RHEL) to build the car. Its name is the Honda Civic Type OveRland, and we're totally into it.

Apparently, Honda UK had a hand in this project, which isn't entirely surprising after seeing the other Type R builds they supported. Let us remind you of the Civic Type R pickup and the Type R wagon Honda UK built. This particular build uses the stock Type R powertrain, so it's still powered by the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that makes 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque. However, the suspension has been lifted a massive four inches, and the track widened considerably. A new bodykit allows room for the big knobby tires sitting at all four corners — it also creates additional cooling vents, and these are actually functional.

Renault Megane R.s. Trophy-r Takes Nurburgring Record From Honda Civic Type R

Renault Megane R.S. Trophy-R takes Nurburgring record from Honda Civic Type R

Almost exactly two years after the 2017 Honda Civic Type R set a new front-wheel-drive production car record at the Nürburgring Nordschleife, it lost it. The new record holder is the Renault Megane R.S. Trophy-R with a time of 7 minutes 40.1 seconds. That's 3.7 seconds faster than the Civic on the roughly 13-mile racetrack. You can see the record lap, which was set on April 5, above.

As for the record-setting Renault, it's based on the Renault Megane R.S. Trophy and uses the same turbocharged 1.8-liter inline-four making 295 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. Where it differs is in weight savings and improved suspension. Exact details aren't available on the chassis upgrades, but the Trophy-R weighs about 287 pounds less than the regular Trophy model.

2019 Honda Civic Review And Buying Guide | A Little Something For Everyone

2019 Honda Civic Review and Buying Guide | A little something for everyone

In the compact car market, the Honda Civic has almost always been a benchmark, and there's a reason for that: it's consistently been really great. The 2019 Honda Civic is no exception. It has a large, airy interior with quality materials. The engines are smooth, powerful and economical. And it's nimble while also being comfortable. Not only that, but there's a Civic for just about any need with sedan, coupe or hatchback body styles — no other compact car offers such diversity. There are also trim levels and powertrains that range from frugal to exhilarating, yet all offer competitive pricing and impressive value. For these reasons and others we'll explain below, the Civic is still one of the best compact cars on the market.

What's new for 2019?

The 2019 Honda Civic marks the third year for this generation, and changes are mostly restricted to some styling tweaks, and trim and feature additions. All Honda Civics, regardless of trim or body style, now have black grilles, replacing the flashy chrome version available on past models. The lower grilles of the sedan and coupe have been merged into one opening, and all trims on sedans and coupes get chrome accents in the lower fascia except the new Sport trim.

The Sport trim has been added to the coupe and sedan models, but unlike the hatchback's Sport trim that gets a turbocharged engine, these Civics stick with the naturally aspirated 2.0-liter four-cylinder. The Sport coupe and sedan do get Honda's touchscreen infotainment system with CarPlay and Android Auto, unlike the Sport hatchback. This infotainment system now features physical shortcut buttons and a volume knob, but it retains the existing user interface. The gauges get red backlighting, the pedals are made of aluminum, the wheels are larger and it has a leather-wrapped steering wheel. A manual transmission is also now restricted to LX sedan, all Sport body styles, the Si and Type R. All other Civics get a CVT.